apposition

See also: Apposition

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English apposicioun, from Middle French apposition, from Latin appositiō, past participle of appōnere (to put near).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

Examples (grammar)
  • my friend Alice
    The name “Alice” is in apposition to “my friend”. As a restrictive appositive it typically takes no commas.
  • my eldest sister, Hannah, is 35
    The name “Hannah” is in apposition to “my eldest sister”. As a nonrestrictive appositive it takes commas.

apposition (countable and uncountable, plural appositions)

  1. (grammar) A construction in which one noun or noun phrase is placed with another as an explanatory equivalent, both of them having the same syntactic function in the sentence.
    Synonym: parathesis
    • 2014, James Lambert, “A Much Tortured Expression: A New Look At `Hobson-Jobson'”, in International Journal of Lexicography, volume 27, number 1, page 65:
      The apposition in the title has been read as indicating that ‘Hobson-Jobson’ is equivalent to ‘colloquial Anglo-Indian words and phrases’.
  2. (grammar) The relationship between such nouns or noun phrases.
  3. The quality of being side-by-side, apposed instead of being opposed, not being front-to-front but next to each other.
  4. A placing of two things side by side, or the fitting together of two things.
  5. (biology) The growth of successive layers of a cell wall.
  6. (rhetoric) Appositio, the addition of an element not syntactically required.
  7. A public disputation by scholars.
  8. (Britain) A (now purely ceremonial) speech day at St Paul's School, London.

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit


FinnishEdit

NounEdit

apposition

  1. Genitive singular form of appositio.

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin appositiō.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /a.po.zi.sjɔ̃/
  • (file)

NounEdit

apposition f (plural appositions)

  1. apposition

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit