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Old IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From ess- +‎ beirid.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

as·beir (prototonic ·epir, verbal noun epert)

  1. to say, utter
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 1d1
      .i. nísnain ciasberatntánicc recht
      i.e. it will not protect them that they say ‘the Law has not come to us’
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 13c13:
      niérbarid autem uerba asbeir intóis anfoirbthe
      ye should not utter autem uerba which the imperfect folk utters
  2. to mention
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 28a20:
      .i. asbertar ananman arnagaba nech desimrecht diib
      i.e. their names are mentioned that no one may take example from them
  3. to speak (a language)
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 12d6:
      .i. arnitucci ambéelre asbiur
      i.e. for he understands not the language I speak

Usage notesEdit

The present and imperfect indicative ro-forms as·robair, as·robarad mean ‘can say’, ‘could say’.

ConjugationEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
as·beir as·beir
pronounced with /-v(ʲ)-/
as·mbeir
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit