See also: Fri, frí, frî, and -fri

Bislama edit

Etymology edit

From English free.

Adjective edit

fri

  1. free; independent

Breton edit

Etymology edit

Cognate with Cornish frig (nostril); perhaps related to Proto-Celtic *srognā (compare Welsh ffroen (nostril), Old Irish srón (nose)).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

fri m (plural frioù)

  1. (anatomy) nose

Danish edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /friː/, [fʁiːˀ]
  • (Hardsysselsk) IPA(key): [fʁitʃː]
  • Rhymes: -i
  • Rhymes: -iː

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from Middle Low German vrīen (to marry), from Old Saxon friohon.

Verb edit

fri (imperative fri, present frier or frir, past friede, past participle friet)

  1. to propose (to ask for one's hand in marriage)
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Borrowed from Middle Low German vrī.

Adjective edit

fri (neuter frit, plural and definite singular attributive frie, comparative friere, superlative (predicative) friest, superlative (attributive) frieste)

  1. free
  2. vacant, unoccupied
  3. available
Derived terms edit
  • ufri (constrained, inhibited, not free)

Etymology 3 edit

Borrowed from Middle Low German vrīen (to free), from the adjective vri (free).

Verb edit

fri (imperative fri, present frier or frir, past friede, past participle friet)

  1. to free (to make free)

References edit

Esperanto edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): [fri]
  • Hyphenation: fri

Preposition edit

fri

  1. (neologism) including the cost of[1]
    mil eŭroj fri haveno
    a thousand euros including shipping costs
    cent dolaroj fri dogano
    one hundred dollars including customs duty

Usage notes edit

Unofficial and technical. In everyday language, this would be expressed with a more wordy phrase.

References edit

  1. ^ Wennergren, Bertilo (0202 November 14) “Neoficialaj rolvortetoj”, in Plena Manlibro de Esperanta Gramatiko[1] (in Esperanto), retrieved 2010-10-08

Irish edit

Preposition edit

fri (plus dative, triggers h-prothesis)

  1. Obsolete form of fré.

Middle Irish edit

Etymology edit

From Old Irish fri, from Proto-Celtic *writ- (compare Welsh wrth, prefix gwrth-), from the zero grade of Proto-Indo-European *wert- (to turn) (compare Latin versus (against)).

Preposition edit

fri (takes accusative)

  1. towards, to
    • c. 1000, “The Tale of Mac Da Thó's Pig”, in Ernst Windisch, editor, Irische Texte, volume 1, published 1800, section 1:
      Ro·ferad failte friu uile, ocus ructha chuci-sium isin mbruidin.
      They were all made welcome and brought to him in the hall.
      (literally, “A welcome was provided to them all…”)

Inflection edit

  • Third-person plural accusative: friu

Descendants edit

  • Irish: , re (against, towards, with)
    Irish: fa ré, fara, frae (along with, beside)
  • Manx: rish
  • Scottish Gaelic: ri

Norwegian Bokmål edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Middle Low German vrī. Cognates include Danish fri, Swedish fri, German frei, Dutch vrij, English free, and Gothic 𐍆𐍂𐌴𐌹𐍃 (freis).

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

fri (neuter singular fritt, definite singular and plural frie, comparative friere, indefinite superlative friest, definite superlative frieste)

  1. free, not imprisoned or enslaved
    en fri manna free man
  2. free, not blocked
    fri ferdselfree traffic
  3. free, no payment necessary
    fri inngangfree admission

Derived terms edit

References edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle Low German vrī.[1] Akin to English free.

Adjective edit

fri (neuter singular fritt, definite singular and plural frie, comparative friare, indefinite superlative friast, definite superlative friaste)

  1. free, not imprisoned or enslaved
    ein fri manna free man
  2. free, not blocked
    fri ferdselfree traffic
  3. free, no payment necessary
    fri inngangfree admission
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Middle Low German vrien and Old Norse frjá (to love).[1]

Alternative forms edit

Verb edit

fri (present tense frir, past tense fridde, past participle fritt/fridd, passive infinitive friast, present participle friande, imperative fri)

  1. to propose (marriage)
Derived terms edit

Etymology 3 edit

From Old Norse fría, from fri (Etymology 1).[1]

Alternative forms edit

Verb edit

fri (present tense frir, past tense fridde, past participle fritt/fridd, passive infinitive friast, present participle friande, imperative fri)

  1. to free

References edit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 “fri” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Anagrams edit

Old Dutch edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-West Germanic *frī.

Adjective edit

frī

  1. free, unbound

Inflection edit

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants edit

Further reading edit

  • frī”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old Frisian edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-West Germanic *frī.

Adjective edit

fri

  1. free

Descendants edit

Old High German edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-West Germanic *frī.

Adjective edit

frī

  1. free

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

Old Irish edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Celtic *writ- (compare Welsh wrth, prefix gwrth-), from the zero grade of Proto-Indo-European *wert- (to turn) (compare Latin versus (against)).

Pronunciation edit

Preposition edit

fri (takes accusative)

  1. towards, to
  2. against
  3. with
  4. (governing a verbal noun) about to

For quotations using this term, see Citations:fri.

Inflection edit

Forms combined with the definite article:

Forms combined with the relative particle:

Forms combined with a possessive determiner:

  • frim (first-person singular)
  • frit (second-person singular)
  • fria (third-person singular/plural)

Descendants edit

  • Middle Irish: fri
    • Irish: , re (against, towards, with)
      Irish: fa ré, fara, frae (along with, beside)
    • Manx: rish
    • Scottish Gaelic: ri

Further reading edit

Old Saxon edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Proto-West Germanic *frī.

Adjective edit

frī (comparative frīoro, superlative frīost)

  1. free
Declension edit


Descendants edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Proto-Germanic *frijō.

Noun edit

frī f

  1. woman

References edit

  • Joseph Wright, An Old English Grammar (Oxford 1908)

Scots edit

Etymology edit

From Old English fram.

Preposition edit

fri

  1. (South Scots) from

See also edit

Sranan Tongo edit

Etymology edit

From English free.

Adjective edit

fri

  1. free

Verb edit

fri

  1. to set free

Noun edit

fri

  1. freedom
    • 1961, Michaël Slory, ““Sarka – Gi Yomo Kenyata (Kenya)” [Bitter struggle – For Jomo Kenyatta (Kenya)]”, in Sarka / Bittere strijd[2], Amsterdam: Pegasus:
      Fri yu no kan skrifi na / ini den nangra fu den opete.
      Freedom cannot be written / in the clutches of vultures.

Swedish edit

Etymology edit

From Middle Low German vri, from Old Saxon frī.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /friː/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iː

Adjective edit

fri

  1. free, unconstrained
  2. free, not imprisoned, released
    fri mot borgenreleased on bail
  3. free, without obligations
    Du är fri att göra som du vill.
    You are free to do as you please.
  4. free of charge, gratis

Declension edit

Inflection of fri
Indefinite Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular fri friare friast
Neuter singular fritt friare friast
Plural fria friare friast
Masculine plural3 frie friare friast
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 frie friare friaste
All fria friare friaste
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in the predicative.
3) Dated or archaic

Derived terms edit

Tarifit edit

Etymology edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.).

Pronunciation edit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

Verb edit

fri (Tifinagh spelling ⴼⵔⵉ)

  1. (transitive) to tear, to rip

Conjugation edit

This verb needs an inflection-table template.

Derived terms edit

Welsh edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

fri

  1. Soft mutation of bri.

Mutation edit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
bri fri mri unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.