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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin asinīnus (of a donkey or ass).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

asinine (comparative more asinine, superlative most asinine)

  1. very foolish; failing to exercise intelligence or judgment or rationality
    • 1922, Michael Arlen, “2/2/2”, in “Piracy”: A Romantic Chronicle of These Days[1]:
      They danced on silently, softly. Their feet played tricks to the beat of the tireless measure, that exquisitely asinine blare which is England's punishment for having lost America.
    Synonyms: foolish, obstinate
  2. of, pertaining to, or characteristic of donkeys
    • 1881, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, The Ingenious Knight: Don Quixote de la Mancha (page 84)
      Don Quixote had put himself but a little way ayont the village of Don Diego, when he encountered two apparent priests, or students, and two husbandmen, who came mounted on four asinine beasts.
    Synonym: donkeyish

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

asinine

  1. feminine singular of asinin

ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

asinine

  1. Feminine plural of adjective asinino.

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

asinīne

  1. vocative masculine singular of asinīnus