See also: Athair

Irish

edit

Pronunciation

edit

Etymology 1

edit

    From Old Irish athair, from Proto-Celtic *ɸatīr, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr.[3]

    Noun

    edit

    athair m (genitive singular athar, nominative plural aithreacha)

    1. father (male parent; term of address for a priest; male ancestor more remote than a parent, a progenitor)
      Fuair m’athair bás.
      My father died.
      • 1899, Franz Nikolaus Finck, Die araner mundart, volume II (overall work in German), Marburg: Elwert’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, page 21:
        ḱē n xȳ ə wil tū, ə æhŕ̥?
        [Cén chaoi a bhfuil tú, a athair?]
        How are you, father? [could be addressed to one’s own father or to a priest, as in English]
      • 1899, Franz Nikolaus Finck, Die araner mundart, volume II (overall work in German), Marburg: Elwert’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, page 22:
        æhŕəxə
        [m’aithreacha]
        my fathers, my ancestors
      • 1899, Franz Nikolaus Finck, Die araner mundart, volume II (overall work in German), Marburg: Elwert’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, page 22:
        h-æhŕəxə n̄ȳfe[4]
        [na haithreacha naofa]
        the Church Fathers
    2. ancestor
    3. sire
    Declension
    edit
    Coordinate terms
    edit
    Derived terms
    edit
    edit

    Etymology 2

    edit

    (This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

    Noun

    edit

    athair f (genitive singular athrach)

    1. creeper
    2. Alternative form of nathair (snake)
    Declension
    edit
    Derived terms
    edit

    Mutation

    edit
    Irish mutation
    Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
    athair n-athair hathair t-athair
    Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

    References

    edit
    1. ^ Sjoestedt, M. L. (1931) Phonétique d’un parler irlandais de Kerry (in French), Paris: Librairie Ernest Leroux, § 187, page 93
    2. ^ Quiggin, E. C. (1906) A Dialect of Donegal, Cambridge University Press, § 80, page 33
    3. ^ Gregory Toner, Sharon Arbuthnot, Máire Ní Mhaonaigh, Marie-Luise Theuerkauf, Dagmar Wodtko, editors (2019), “1 athair”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
    4. ^ Corrected by the author on p. 257 to nȳfə

    Further reading

    edit

    Old Irish

    edit

    Alternative forms

    edit

    Etymology

    edit

      From Proto-Celtic *ɸatīr, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr.

      Pronunciation

      edit

      Noun

      edit

      athair m (genitive athar, nominative plural aithir)

      1. father
        • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 124b3
          Ní du ṡémigud pectha at·ber-som inso .i. combad dó fa·cherred: “ní sní cetid·deirgni ⁊ ní sní dud·rigni nammá”; acht is do chuingid dílguda dosom, amal du·rolged dïa aithrib íar n-immarmus.
          It is not to palliate sin that he says this, i.e. so that he might put it for this: “we have not done it first and we have not done it only”; but it is to seek forgiveness for himself, as his fathers had been forgiven after sinning.
          (literally, “…as had been forgiven to his fathers”)

      Inflection

      edit
      Masculine r-stem
      Singular Dual Plural
      Nominative athair athairL aithir
      Vocative athair athairL aithrea
      Accusative athairN athairL aithrea
      Genitive athar athar aithreN, athraeN
      Dative athairL aithrib, athraib aithrib, athraib
      Initial mutations of a following adjective:
      • H = triggers aspiration
      • L = triggers lenition
      • N = triggers nasalization

      Derived terms

      edit

      Descendants

      edit
      • Irish: athair
      • Manx: ayr
        • English: ayr
      • Scottish Gaelic: athair

      Mutation

      edit
      Old Irish mutation
      Radical Lenition Nasalization
      athair unchanged n-athair
      Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
      possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

      Further reading

      edit

      Scottish Gaelic

      edit

      Etymology

      edit

        From Old Irish athair, from Proto-Celtic *ɸatīr, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr.

        Pronunciation

        edit

        Noun

        edit

        athair m (genitive singular athar, plural athraichean)

        1. father

        Declension

        edit

        Antonyms

        edit

        Derived terms

        edit

        Mutation

        edit
        Scottish Gaelic mutation
        Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
        athair n-athair h-athair t-athair
        Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

        Further reading

        edit