EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Clipping of mackintosh.

NounEdit

mac (plural macs)

  1. Clipping of mackintosh (a raincoat).
    • 1969, John Lennon; Paul McCartney, The Ballad of John and Yoko[1], Vevo, published 2017, 0:04 from the start:
      Standing in the dock at Southampton / Trying to get to Holland or France / The man in the mac said / You've got to go back / You know they didn't even give us a chance
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Clipping of macaroni.

NounEdit

mac (uncountable)

  1. (Canada, US, slang) Clipping of macaroni.
    Is there any mac and cheese left?
Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

mac m (plural macs)

  1. (colloquial, slang) Clipping of maquereau (pimp).
    • 1997, “Elle donne son corps avant son nom”, in L'École du micro d'argent, performed by IAM:
      Devant la porte, y'avait le type du bar, la baraque / On a compris, mais trop tard, que ce mec était leur mac
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

mac m (plural macs)

  1. (colloquial, computing) Clipping of Macintosh.

Further readingEdit


IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish macc, from Primitive Irish ᚋᚐᚊᚊᚔ (maqqi, genitive), from Proto-Celtic *makkʷos, a variant of *makʷos (son) (compare Welsh mab, Gaulish mapos, Maponos).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mac m (genitive singular mic, nominative plural mic)

  1. son
  2. A common prefix of many Irish and Scottish names, signifying "son of".
    Dónall óg donn Mac Lochlainnyoung, brown-haired Donald, son of the Scandinavian

DeclensionEdit

Coordinate termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
mac mhac not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


K'iche'Edit

NounEdit

mac

  1. (Classical K'iche') sin

ManxEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish macc, from Primitive Irish ᚋᚐᚊᚊᚔ (maqqi, genitive), from Proto-Celtic *makkʷos, a variant of *makʷos (son), from Proto-Indo-European *meh₂ḱ- (to raise, increase).

NounEdit

mac m (genitive singular mic, plural mec)

  1. son

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Manx mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
mac vac unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


Middle IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish macc, from Primitive Irish ᚋᚐᚊᚊᚔ (maqqi, genitive), from Proto-Celtic *makkʷos, a variant of *makʷos (son), from Proto-Indo-European *meh₂ḱ- (to raise, increase).

NounEdit

mac m (genitive mic, nominative plural mic)

  1. son

DescendantsEdit

  • Irish: mac
  • Manx: mac
  • Scottish Gaelic: mac

MutationEdit

Middle Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
mac mac
pronounced with /ṽ(ʲ)-/
unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


Old IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *makkos. Cognate with Welsh mach.[1]

NounEdit

mac m

  1. bond, surety

InflectionEdit

Masculine o-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative mac macL maicL
Vocative maic macL macuH
Accusative macN macL macuH
Genitive maicL mac macN
Dative macL macaib macaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
mac
also mmac after a proclitic
mac
pronounced with /ṽ(ʲ)-/
unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “mach”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

Further readingEdit


RomanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From a Slavic language, from Proto-Slavic *makъ (poppy), compare Serbo-Croatian and Polish mak.

NounEdit

mac m (plural maci)

  1. poppy
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Onomatopoeic.

InterjectionEdit

mac

  1. quack (sound made by ducks)

Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish macc, from Primitive Irish ᚋᚐᚊᚊᚔ (maqqi, genitive), from Proto-Celtic *makkʷos, a variant of *makʷos (son), from Proto-Indo-European *meh₂ḱ- (to raise, increase).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mac m (genitive singular mic, plural mic)

  1. son
  2. Commonly used as a prefix of Irish and Scottish surnames, meaning son.
    MacDhòmhnaill (MacDonald, literally son of Donald, Donaldson)

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
mac mhac
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  • mac” in Edward Dwelly, Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic–English Dictionary, 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, 1911, →ISBN.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “1 mac, macc”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language