See also: BLE and blé

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Possibly from a reconstructed *bledino-, a derivation of Proto-Celtic *bledyos (wolf). Among the many common names in the languages of Europe for Verbascum thapsus (the common mullein), whose long leaves were historically used to make wicks, are the equivalents of "wolf's tail" or "fox's tail". (For example, Welsh cynffon llwynog ("fox's tail"), dialectal Catalan cua de guilla (fox's tail).)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ble m (plural blens)

  1. wick

Further readingEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse blæja (sheet, blanket). Compare Norwegian Bokmål bleie, Swedish blöja

NounEdit

ble c (singular definite bleen, plural indefinite bleer)

  1. diaper, nappy; An absorbent garment worn by a baby, or by someone who is incontinent.

InflectionEdit


Haitian CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French bleu (blue).

AdjectiveEdit

ble

  1. blue

LakotaEdit

EtymologyEdit

Cognate with Dakota bdé

NounEdit

ble

  1. lake

NeapolitanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

ble ? (plural [please provide])

  1. blue

Norwegian BokmålEdit

VerbEdit

ble

  1. past tense of bli

WelshEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Contraction of ba le from pa le (which place), mutated so as to show adverbial usage.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

ble

  1. where

MutationEdit

Mutation of ble is unusual in that its mutated forms derive from the original pa le, resulting in ble (soft), mhle (soft) and phle (aspirate). Usage of mhle and phle is limited, if at all found in the case of the latter, with users preferring an unmutable ble in all contexts.