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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English sort, soort, sorte (= Dutch soort, German Sorte, Danish sort, Swedish sort), borrowed from Old French sorte (class, kind), from Latin sortem, accusative form of sors (lot, fate, share, rank, category).

NounEdit

sort (plural sorts)

  1. A general type.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 1, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      I stumbled along through the young pines and huckleberry bushes. Pretty soon I struck into a sort of path that, I cal'lated, might lead to the road I was hunting for. It twisted and turned, and, the first thing I knew, made a sudden bend around a bunch of bayberry scrub and opened out into a big clear space like a lawn.
    • 1922, Ben Travers, chapter 1, in A Cuckoo in the Nest[2]:
      “[…] the awfully hearty sort of Christmas cards that people do send to other people that they don't know at all well. You know. The kind that have mottoes like
        Here's rattling good luck and roaring good cheer, / With lashings of food and great hogsheads of beer. []
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 17, in The China Governess[3]:
      The face which emerged was not reassuring. []. He was not a mongol but there was a deficiency of a sort there, and it was not made more pretty by a latter-day hair cut which involved eccentrically long elf-locks and oiled black curls.
    • 2013 June 14, Sam Leith, “Where the profound meets the profane”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 1, page 37:
      Swearing doesn't just mean what we now understand by "dirty words". It is entwined, in social and linguistic history, with the other sort of swearing: vows and oaths.
  2. Manner; form of being or acting.
    • 1758, Edmund Spenser, The Fairy Queen[4]:
      Soon as the term of those six years shall cease,
      Ye then shall hither back return again,
      The marriage to accomplish vow'd betwixt you twain.
      Which for my part, I covet to perform,
      In sort as through the world I did proclaim,
      That whoso kill'd that monfter (most deform)
      And him in hardy battle overcame,
      Should have mine only daughter to his Dame...
    • 1845, Richard Hooker, Works of that Learned and Judicious Divine...[5]:
      Such is that argument whereby they that wore on their heads garlands are charged as transgressors of nature's law, and guilty of sacrilege against God the Lord of nature, inasmuch as flowers, in such sort worn can neither be smelt nor seen well by those that wear them; and God made flowers sweet and beautiful, that being seen and smelt unto, they might so delight.
    • ca 1590, William Shakespeare, Titus Andronicus:
      I'll deceive you in another sort
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise lost[[6]]:
      But to Adam in what sort
      Shall I appeer? shall I to him make known
      As yet my change, and give him to partake
      Full happiness with mee, or rather not,
      But keep the odds of Knowledge within my power
      Without copartner?
    • 1697, John Dryden, The Works of John Dryden, Volume V: Poems[7], →ISBN:
      I acknowledge, with Segrais, that I have not succeeded in this attempt, according to my desire: yet I shall not be wholly without praise, if in some sort I may be allow'd to have copied the Clearness, the Purity, the Easiness and the Magnificence of his stile.
    • 1910, Emerson Hough, chapter II, in The Purchase Price: Or The Cause of Compromise, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, OCLC 639762314, page 0147:
      Carried somehow, somewhither, for some reason, on these surging floods, were these travelers, of errand not wholly obvious to their fellows, yet of such sort as to call into query alike the nature of their errand and their own relations. It is easily earned repetition to state that Josephine St. Auban's was a presence not to be concealed.
  3. (obsolete) Condition above the vulgar; rank.
    • ca 1599, William Shakespeare, Henry V:
      "What think you, Captain Fluellen? is it fit this soldier keep his oath?"
      "He is a craven and a villain else, an't please your majesty, in my conscience."
      "It may be his enemy is a gentleman of great sort, quite from the answer of his degree."
      "Though he be as good a gentleman as the devil is, as Lucifer and Belzebub himself, it is necessary, look your grace, that he keep his vow and his oath."
  4. (informal) A person evaluated in a certain way (bad, good, strange, etc.).
    • 1999 October 1, Heinrich Müller, Müller Journals: 1948-1950, The Washington years[8]:
      There is no problem with this and he seems to be a decent sort with very good reflexes. I will have Felix replaced with him when we get back to Washington because he is more acceptable.
      2014, Mykel D. Myles, The Long Night Of The Demon, →ISBN:
      Amo, he is the prince. And he is a good sort. You, My Husband, should be among his circle
      2014, Seema Jha, Charade978-1-4969-8816-4:
      One doesn't need to be Einstein to realize he is a bad sort My wife always said as much.
  5. (dated) Group, company.
    • 1595, Edmund Spenser, The Poetical Works of Edmund Spenser[9]:
      a sort of shepherds suing of the Chace
      1687, John Dryden, The Hind and the Panther[10]:
      a sort of doves were housed too near their hall
      1622, Philip Massinger, The Virgin Martyr[11]:
      What good got you by wearing out your feet,
      To run on scurvy errands to the poor,
      and to bear mony to a sort of rogues
      And lousy prisoners?
    • 1616, George Chapman, The Odysseys of Homer[12]:
      A boy, a child, and we a sort of us,
      Vowed against his voyage, yet admit it thus!
  6. (Australia, informal) A good-looking woman.
  7. An act of sorting.
    I had a sort of my cupboard.
  8. (computing) An algorithm for sorting a list of items into a particular sequence.
    • 2014, Donald E. Knuth, The Art of Computer Programming. Sorting and Searching, →ISBN:
      The fastest general algorithm we have considered that sorts keys in a stable manner is the list merge sort, but it does not use minimum storage
    Popular algorithms for sorts include quicksort and heapsort.
  9. (typography) A piece of metal type used to print one letter, character, or symbol in a particular size and style.
  10. (mathematics) A type.
  11. (obsolete) Chance; lot; destiny.
    • ca 1602, William Shakespeare, Troilus and Cressida:
      No, make a lottery;
      And, by device, let blockish Ajax draw
      The sort to fight with Hector.
  12. (obsolete) A full set of anything, such as a pair of shoes, or a suit of clothes.[1]


QuotationsEdit
SynonymsEdit
HyponymsEdit
(computing) Algorithm for sorting a list of items
Derived termsEdit
(computing) Algorithm for sorting a list of items
Related termsEdit
non-computer-specific terms related to "sort"
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Old French sortir (allot, sort), from Latin sortire (draw lots, divide, choose), from sors.

VerbEdit

sort (third-person singular simple present sorts, present participle sorting, simple past and past participle sorted)

  1. (transitive) To separate items into different categories according to certain criteria that determine their sorts.
    Sort the letters in those bags into a separate pile for each language that you recognise; sort the rest into a common pile for later attention.
    • 1704, Isaac Newton, Opticks:
      And seeing the Rays which differ in Refrangibility may be parted and sorted from one another, and that either by Refraction..., or by Reflexion..., and then the several sorts apart at equal Incidences suffer unequal Refractions,...; it's manifest that the Sun's Light is an heterogeneous Mixture of Rays..., as was proposed.
    • 1929, Percival Christopher Wren, Good Gestes, The McSnorrt Reminiscent:
      "Is there a man among ye has the Gaelic? ... Is there a man among ye can speak English even? ... Is there a man among ye at all? Ye gang o' lasceevious auld de'ils, decked oot like weemin, in spite o' yer hairy long whuskers, full beards and full skirts, ye deceitful besoms. Whuskers and petticoats wi' the vices o' both and the virtues o' neither. I'll sorrt ye." And there were sounds of alarums and excursions within.
    • 2017 August 27, Brandon Nowalk, “Game Of Thrones slows down for the longest, and best, episode of the season (newbies)”, in The Onion AV Club[13]:
      Jaime finally leaves her [Cersei], walking right past his imminent executioner, and rides out of King’s Landing, finally neatly sorting our humans into good and evil and Bronn.
  2. (transitive) To arrange into some sequence, usually numerically, alphabetically or chronologically.
    Sort those bells into a row in ascending sequence of pitch: lowest tones on the left; highest on the right.
  3. (transitive) To conjoin; to put together in distribution; to class.
    • 1635, Sylva Sylvarum, Or, A Naturall Historie in Ten Centuries[14]:
      Shellfish have been, by some of the ancients, compared and sorted with insecta.
    • 1599, John Davies, Nosce Teipsum[15]:
      For when she sorts things present with things past
      And thereby things to come doth oft foresee;
      When she doth doubt at first, and chuse at last,
      These acts her owne, without her body bee.
  4. (transitive, obsolete) To conform; to adapt; to accommodate.
    • ca 1591, William Shakespeare, Henry VI part 2:
      I pray thee, sort thy heart to patience.
  5. (transitive, obsolete) To choose from a number; to select; to cull.
    • 1616, George Chapman, The Odysseys of Homer[16]:
      To send his mother to her father's house,
      that he may sort her out a worthy spouse
    • ca 1591, William Shakespeare, Henry VI part 1:
      I'll sort some other time to visit you.
  6. (intransitive) To join or associate with others, especially with others of the same kind or species; to agree.
    • 1625, Francis Bacon, Of Parents and Children:
      The illiberality of Parents in allowance towards their children is an harmefull error: makes them base; acquaints them with shifts, makes them sort with meane companie; and makes them surfet more, when they come to plenty.
    • 1695, John Woodward, An essay toward a natural history of the earth:
      Nor do Metalls only sort and herd with Metalls in the Earth : and Minerals with Minerals : but both indifferently and in common together: Iron with Vitriol, with Alum, with Sulphur: Copper with Sulphur, with Vitriol, &c. yea Iron, Copper, Lead, Nitre, Sulphur, Vitriol, and perhaps some more in one and the same Mass.
  7. (intransitive) To suit; to fit; to be in accord; to harmonize.
    • 1612, Francis Bacon, Of Nature in Men:
      They are happie men, whose natures sort with their vocations, otherwise they may say Multum incola fuit anima mea; when they converse in those things they doe not affect.
    • 1814, Walter Scott, Waverley:
      I cannot tell ye precisely how they sorted; but they agreed sae right that Donald was invited to dance at the wedding in his Highland trews, and they said that there was never sae meikle siller clinked in his purse either before or since.
  8. (Britain, colloquial) To fix a problem or handle a task; to sort out.
Usage notesEdit

In British sense “to fix a problem”, often used in constructions like “I’ll get you sorted” or “Now that’s sorted” – in American and Australian usage sort out is used instead.

SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • sort at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • sort in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan sort, from Latin sortem, accusative singular of sors, from Proto-Italic *sortis, from Proto-Indo-European *ser- (to bind).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sort f (uncountable)

  1. luck
  2. fortune

Derived termsEdit


DanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse svartr (black), from Proto-Germanic *swartaz, from Proto-Indo-European *swordo- (dirty, dark, black).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sort

  1. black (absorbing most light)
  2. being done without incurring taxation
InflectionEdit
Inflection of sort
Positive Comparative Superlative
Common singular sort sortere sortest2
Neuter singular sort sortere sortest2
Plural sorte sortere sortest2
Definite attributive1 sorte sortere sorteste
1) When an adjective is applied predicatively to something definite, the corresponding "indefinite" form is used.
2) The "indefinite" superlatives may not be used attributively.
Derived termsEdit

AdverbEdit

sort

  1. being done without incurring taxation
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from French sorte (class, kind), from Latin sors (lot, fate).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sort c (singular definite sorten, plural indefinite sorter)

  1. sort, kind
  2. quality
  3. brand
  4. (botany) cultivar
DeclensionEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit


EstonianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From German Sorte.

NounEdit

sort (genitive sordi, partitive sorti)

  1. kind, sort, brand

DeclensionEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French sort, from Latin sortem, accusative singular of sors, from Proto-Italic *sortis, from Proto-Indo-European *ser- (to bind). Cf. also the borrowed doublet sorte.

NounEdit

sort m (plural sorts)

  1. fate, destiny (consequences or effects predetermined by past events or a divine will)
  2. lot (something used in determining a question by chance)
  3. spell (magical incantation)

Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See sortir.

VerbEdit

sort

  1. third-person singular present indicative of sortir

Further readingEdit


FriulianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • sord (alternative orthography)

EtymologyEdit

From Latin surdus.

AdjectiveEdit

sort

  1. deaf

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit


HungarianEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from English shorts.[2]

NounEdit

sort (plural sortok)

  1. shorts (pants worn primarily in the summer that do not go lower than the knees)

DeclensionEdit

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative sort sortok
accusative sortot sortokat
dative sortnak sortoknak
instrumental sorttal sortokkal
causal-final sortért sortokért
translative sorttá sortokká
terminative sortig sortokig
essive-formal sortként sortokként
essive-modal
inessive sortban sortokban
superessive sorton sortokon
adessive sortnál sortoknál
illative sortba sortokba
sublative sortra sortokra
allative sorthoz sortokhoz
elative sortból sortokból
delative sortról sortokról
ablative sorttól sortoktól
Possessive forms of sort
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. sortom sortjaim
2nd person sing. sortod sortjaid
3rd person sing. sortja sortjai
1st person plural sortunk sortjaink
2nd person plural sortotok sortjaitok
3rd person plural sortjuk sortjaik
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

sor +‎ -t

NounEdit

sort

  1. accusative singular of sor

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Samuel Johnson, "A Dictionary of the English Language", [1] publisher=W. G. Jones year=1768
  2. ^ Zaicz, Gábor. Etimológiai szótár: Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete (’Dictionary of Etymology: The origin of Hungarian words and affixes’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2006, →ISBN

NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French sort, from Latin sors, sortem.

NounEdit

sort m (plural sorts)

  1. (Jersey) fate

SynonymsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no
 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse svartr; compare Danish sort

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sort (neuter singular sort, definite singular and plural sorte, comparative sortere, indefinite plural sortest, definite plural sorteste)

  1. black (colour)

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from French sorte.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sort m (definite singular sorten, indefinite plural sorter, definite plural sortene)

  1. a sort, kind or type

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French sorte.

NounEdit

sort m (definite singular sorten, indefinite plural sortar, definite plural sortane)

  1. a sort, kind or type

ReferencesEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French sorte.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sort c

  1. sort, kind

DeclensionEdit

Declension of sort 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative sort sorten sorter sorterna
Genitive sorts sortens sorters sorternas

SynonymsEdit