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Old IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • cech (usual form in the Milan glosses)

EtymologyEdit

Shortened from cách (everyone, everything), from Proto-Celtic *kʷākʷos; cognate with Middle Welsh pawb (modern Welsh pob).

PronunciationEdit

DeterminerEdit

cach (usual form in the Würzburg and St Gall glosses)

  1. each, every
    • c. 845, St. Gall Glosses on Priscian, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1975, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. II, pp. 49–224, Sg. 190b4
      At·robair cach cenél
      Every gender can say it.

InflectionEdit

Mostly invariable, but the following forms are also rarely attested:

  • cacha, cecha (genitive singular feminine; plural of all cases and genders)
  • caich (genitive singular neuter)

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
cach chach cach
pronounced with /ɡ(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


WelshEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Brythonic *kax, from Proto-Celtic *kakkos, *kakkā, from a very widespread child-language word for feces.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cach m (uncountable)

  1. shit

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
cach gach nghach chach
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950-), “cach”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies