See also: Calamus

English

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Acorus calamus

Etymology

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Borrowed from Latin calamus (reed, cane), from Ancient Greek κάλαμος (kálamos). Doublet of calame, culm, haulm, helm (Etymology 4), and shawm.

Noun

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calamus (usually uncountable, plural calamuses or calami)

  1. The sweet flag, Acorus calamus.
  2. (ornithology) A quill; the hard, horny, hollow, and more or less transparent part of the stem or scape of a feather.
    • 1956, Advisory Board on Quartermaster Research and Development, The Utilization of Chicken Feathers as Filling Materials, page 9:
      Thus, the four distinct feather parts that have been compared as to amino acid content to note whether or not the composition is uniform are rachis, barbs, calamus and medulla.
    • 1969, RIC Spearman, “The epidermis and feather follicles of the king penguin (Aptenodytes patagonica) (aves)”, in Zeitschrift für Morphologie der Tiere:
      In follicles late in feather growth, after rupture of the feather sheath, this canal contained the upper part of the calamus.
    • 1969, CH Fry, “Structural and functional adaptation to display in the Standard‐winged nightjar Macrodipteryx longipennis”, in Journal of Zoology:
      Chapin asserted that the calamus is firmly fixed in the wing
  3. A fish of genus Calamus in family Sparidae; certain porgies.
  4. A palm in genus Calamus, of rattan palms.
  5. (Christianity, historical) Synonym of fistula (tube for sucking Eucharist wine)

Translations

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Further reading

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Latin

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Etymology

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From Ancient Greek κάλαμος (kálamos), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ḱolh₂mos. Doublet of culmus. Compare calamīna.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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calamus m (genitive calamī); second declension

  1. a reed, cane
  2. (by extension) an object made from a reed, such as a reed pen, arrow, or fishing rod
    • Motto of Keio University:
      Calamus gladio fortior
      The pen is mightier than the sword.
  3. (of plants) a stalk, straw, blade
  4. the hollow arm of a candelabrum
  5. a whistle or musical pipe; sometimes specifically a blown pipe with tone holes

Declension

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Second-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative calamus calamī
Genitive calamī calamōrum
Dative calamō calamīs
Accusative calamum calamōs
Ablative calamō calamīs
Vocative calame calamī

Derived terms

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Descendants

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References

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  • calamus”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • calamus”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • calamus in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • calamus in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette.
  • calamus”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898), Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • calamus”, in William Smith et al., editor (1890), A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin
  • Lexicon musicum Latinum medii aevi, digital version in the Wörterbuchnetz des Trier Center for Digital Humanities, version 01/21, accessed 12 May 2022.[1]