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See also: Helm, hełm, hel'm, and helm'

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English helm, helme, from Old English helma, from Proto-Germanic *helmô (handle).

NounEdit

helm (plural helms)

  1. (nautical) The steering apparatus of a ship, especially the tiller or wheel.
  2. (maritime) The member of the crew in charge of steering the boat.
  3. (figuratively) A position of leadership or control.
    the helm of the Commonwealth
    • 2011 January 11, Jonathan Stevenson, “West Ham 2 - 1 Birmingham”, in BBC[1]:
      Grant will be desperate to finish the job of getting West Ham to their first Wembley cup final in 30 years when they meet Birmingham in the second leg at St Andrews on 26 January; though arguably of more pressing concern is whether he will still be at the helm for Saturday's Premier League encounter with Arsenal.
  4. One at the place of direction or control; a guide; a director.
    • Shakespeare
      the helms o' the State, who care for you like fathers
  5. (heraldry) A helmet.
  6. (obsolete, Britain, dialect) A helve.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

helm (third-person singular simple present helms, present participle helming, simple past and past participle helmed)

  1. To be a helmsman or a member of the helm; to be in charge of steering the boat.
    • Tennyson
      A wild wave [] overbears the bark, / And him that helms it.
  2. (by extension) To lead (a project, etc.).
    • 2014, Malcolm Jack, "John Grant with the Royal Northern Sinfonia review – positively spine-tingling", The Guardian, 1 December 2014:
      “I wanted to change the world, but I could not even change my underwear,” sings John Grant at the piano, in a luxuriant baritone croon as thick and healthy as his beard. It’s hard to reconcile the guy who once struggled to so much as put on clean pants back in the bad old days – well-storied, not least through his own songs – with the one warmly and gracefully helming this complex, prestigious production – the penultimate date on a tour of packed concert halls, backed by an orchestra.
    • Shakespeare
      the business he hath helmed

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English helm, from Old English helm (helmet), Proto-Germanic *helmaz (protective covering), probably from Proto-Indo-European *ḱelmos, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱel- (to cover; hide; protect); Compare West Frisian helm, Dutch helm, Low German Helm, German Helm, Danish, Norwegian hjelm.

NounEdit

helm (plural helms or helmen)

  1. (rare, poetic) A helmet.
    • Luken sweord longe, leiden o þe helmen. — Layamon's Brut, 1275
    (They drew their swords and put on their helmen.)
    • Þe helm of hel and þe swerd of þe Spirit. — An Apology for Lollard Doctrines, Attributed to Wycliffe, 1475
    • The kynge Ban be-gan to laugh vndir his helme. — Merlin, 1500
    • 1927, Edgar Rice Burrows, The Outlaw of Torn[2], HTML edition, The Gutenberg Project, published 2008:
      "A fearful apparition," murmured Norman of Torn. "No wonder he keeps his helm closed."
  2. A heavy cloud lying on the brow of a mountain.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

helm (plural helms)

  1. Alternative form of haulm (a straw)

AlbanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Albanian *hal(i)m, from Proto-Indo-European *sKel- (to cut (off)). Cognate to Old High German scalmo (plague, pestilence), Welsh claf (sick)[1].

NounEdit

helm m

  1. poison

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Albanische Etymologien (Untersuchungen zum albanischen Erbwortschatz), Bardhyl Demiraj, Leiden Studies in Indo-European 7; Amsterdam - Atlanta 1997, p.198

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch *helm, from Proto-Germanic *helmaz. Compare West Frisian helm, Low German Helm, German Helm, Danish hjelm.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

helm m (plural helmen, diminutive helmpje n)

  1. helmet
  2. (heraldry) helmet

IndonesianEdit

NounEdit

helm

  1. helmet (protective head covering)


This Indonesian entry was created from the translations listed at helmet. It may be less reliable than other entries, and may be missing parts of speech or additional senses. Please also see helm in the Indonesian Wiktionary. This notice will be removed when the entry is checked. (more information) May 2009


LudianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Akin to Finnish helma.

NounEdit

helm

  1. hem

Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *helmaz (protective covering), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱel- (to cover, to hide). Compare Old Frisian helm, Old Saxon helm, Old High German helm, Old Norse hjalmr, Gothic 𐌷𐌹𐌻𐌼𐍃 (hilms).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

helm m (nominative plural helmas)

  1. helmet, protection, defense, covering, crown
    • Hyrsta scýne, bord and brád swyrd, brúne helmas — Judith (excellent/beautiful gear, shield and broad sword, brown helmen)
  2. summit, top (of trees)
  3. protector, lord

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *helmaz. Compare Old Saxon helm, Old English helm, Old Norse hjalmr, Gothic 𐌷𐌹𐌻𐌼𐍃 (hilms).

NounEdit

helm m

  1. helmet

DescendantsEdit