See also: Cassia and Cássia

English edit

 
A cassia flower

Etymology edit

From Latin cassia (cinnamon), from Ancient Greek κασσία, κασία, κάσια (kassía, kasía, kásia), from Hebrew קְצִיעָה (qəṣīʿā), from Aramaic קְצִיעֲתָא (qəṣīʿătā), from קְצַע (qṣaʿ, to cut off). Compare Kezia.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

cassia (countable and uncountable, plural cassias or cassiæ)

  1. (uncountable) The spice made from the bark of members of the genus Cinnamomum other than true cinnamon (C. verum), when they are distinguished from cinnamon.
  2. (countable) Such trees themselves, particularly the Chinese cinnamon, Cinnamomum cassia.
    • 1697, Virgil, “The Second Pastoral. Or, Alexis.”, in John Dryden, transl., The Works of Virgil: Containing His Pastorals, Georgics, and Æneis. [], London: [] Jacob Tonson, [], →OCLC, page 6:
      The Daughters of the Flood have ſearch'd the Mead / For Violets pale, and cropt the Poppy's Head: / The Short Narciſſus and fair Daffodil, / Pancies to pleaſe the Sight, and Caſſia ſvveet to ſmell: []
  3. (countable) Any of several tropical leguminous plants, of the genus Cassia.
  4. (countable) Any of several tropical leguminous plants, of the genus Senna.
  5. (countable, mistranslation from Chinese) The sweet osmanthus (O. fragrans).

Usage notes edit

Cassia is typically marketed in American English as “cinnamon” but is typically distinguished from Sri Lankan cinnamon in Europe. The oil content of the bark of the Saigon cinnamon is actually superior to that of true cinnamon, but Chinese cassia and Indonesian cinnamon have somewhat less.

Sweet osmanthus and cassia were both formerly in Chinese and the character is often translated as "cassia", owing to its greater importance in modern international trade; however, it is generally the sweet-smelling osmanthus that is meant.

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

See also edit

References edit

  • Taylor, William R. (1955) Exegesis on Psalms. The Interpreter's Bible, volume IV, page 235
  • qṣyˁh”, in The Comprehensive Aramaic Lexicon Project, Cincinnati: Hebrew Union College, 1986–
  • Löw, Immanuel (1924) Die Flora der Juden[1] (in German), volume 2, Wien und Leipzig: R. Löwit, pages 113–115
  • Löw, Immanuel (1881) Aramæische Pflanzennamen[2] (in German), Leipzig: Wilhelm Engelmann, pages 348–349

Anagrams edit

Latin edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Ancient Greek κασσία, κασία. κάσια (kassía, kasía. kásia), from Hebrew קְצִיעָה (qəṣīʿā), from Aramaic קְצִיעֲתָא (qəṣīʿătā), from קְצַע (qṣaʿ, to cut off).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

cassia f (genitive cassiae); first declension

  1. Chinese cinnamon (Cinnamomum cassia)
  2. golden shower (Cassia fistula)
    • 690–750, Excerpta ex libro glossarum published in the Corpus glossariorum latinorum V page 179, 6 (Cassia fistula)
      Citisum genus arboris quasi catanum erba odoribera uergilius et uix humiles apibus casias rorem que
      Cytisus is a kind of tree like juniper a sweet-smelling herb, greener and hardly serving the bees in comparison to goldenrain tree and rosemary.

Declension edit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative cassia cassiae
Genitive cassiae cassiārum
Dative cassiae cassiīs
Accusative cassiam cassiās
Ablative cassiā cassiīs
Vocative cassia cassiae

References edit

  • cassia”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • cassia in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • Genaust, Helmut (1996) “cassia”, in Etymologisches Wörterbuch der botanischen Pflanzennamen (in German), 3rd edition, Basel: Birkhäuser Verlag, →ISBN, page 132b
  • Taylor, William R. (1955) Exegesis on Psalms. The Interpreter's Bible, volume IV, page 235
  • qṣyˁh”, in The Comprehensive Aramaic Lexicon Project, Cincinnati: Hebrew Union College, 1986–
  • Löw, Immanuel (1924) Die Flora der Juden[3] (in German), volume 2, Wien und Leipzig: R. Löwit, pages 113–115
  • Löw, Immanuel (1881) Aramæische Pflanzennamen[4] (in German), Leipzig: Wilhelm Engelmann, pages 348–349