cathartic

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Learned borrowing from New Latin catharticus, from Ancient Greek καθαρτικός (kathartikós).

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)tɪk

AdjectiveEdit

cathartic (comparative more cathartic, superlative most cathartic)

  1. Purgative; inducing (mental or physical) catharsis
  2. That releases emotional tension, especially after an overwhelming experience

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

cathartic (plural cathartics)

  1. (medicine) A laxative.
    • 1833, R. J. Bertin, Charles W. Chauncy, transl., Treatise on the Diseases of the Heart, and Great Vessels, Philadelphia: Carey, Lea & Blnachard, page 165:
      The disease was regarded as pneumonia so far advanced that suppuration seemed to have supervened; bleeding, blisters, expectorants, and cathartics diminished the symptoms; the pulse continued frequent, hard, full, but always regular.

TranslationsEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French cathartique, from New Latin catharticus, from Ancient Greek καθαρτικός (kathartikós).

AdjectiveEdit

cathartic m or n (feminine singular cathartică, masculine plural cathartici, feminine and neuter plural cathartice)

  1. cathartic

DeclensionEdit