Open main menu

Wiktionary β

Contents

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Historically regarded as a diminutive of canis (dog) or maybe from Proto-Indo-European *kat- (cub)[1]. Cognates include Old Irish cadla and Old Norse haðna.

NounEdit

catulus m (genitive catulī); second declension

  1. whelp
  2. young dog, puppy

InflectionEdit

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative catulus catulī
genitive catulī catulōrum
dative catulō catulīs
accusative catulum catulōs
ablative catulō catulīs
vocative catule catulī

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Portuguese: cátulo (learned loan)

ReferencesEdit

  • catulus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • catulus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “catulus”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • catulus” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • catulus in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • catulus in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray
  1. ^ Walde, Alois; Hofmann, Johann Baptist (1938), “catulus”, in Lateinisches etymologisches Wörterbuch (in German), volume I, 3rd edition, Heidelberg: Carl Winter, page 183