charivari

Contents

EnglishEdit

The cover of the first issue (1841) of the British satirical magazine Punch, or the London Charivari

EtymologyEdit

From French charivari.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

charivari ‎(countable and uncountable, plural charivaris)

  1. The noisy banging of pots and pans as a mock serenade to a newly married couple, or similar occasion.
    • 2002, Colin Jones, The Great Nation, Penguin 2003, p. 94:
      The marriage ceremony was given primordial significance over folkloric pre-marriage engagement rituals and wild charvaris.
  2. Any loud, cacophonous noise or hubbub.

Related termsEdit

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French chalivali ‎(noise from pots and pans), from Late Latin caribaria, from carivaria, from Ancient Greek καρηβάρεια ‎(karēbáreia, headache), from καρη ‎(head) + βαρύς ‎(barús, heavy).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

charivari m ‎(plural charivaris)

  1. charivari, shivaree, mock serenade of discordant noise, notably to heckle a publicly reviled figure
  2. A racket, banging in general, rumpus

External linksEdit

Read in another language