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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French sérénade, from Italian serenata, from the past participle of serenare, from Latin serenare, from serenus (calm).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

serenade (plural serenades)

  1. A love song that is sung directly to one's love interest, especially one performed below the window of a loved one in the evening.
  2. (music) An instrumental composition in several movements.
    “Eine kleine Nachtmusik” is a well-known serenade written by Mozart.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

serenade (third-person singular simple present serenades, present participle serenading, simple past and past participle serenaded)

  1. To sing or play a serenade (for someone).
    • 2013, Daniel Taylor, Rickie Lambert's debut goal gives England victory over Scotland (in The Guardian, 14 August 2013)[1]
      The Southampton striker, who also struck a post late on, was being serenaded by the Wembley crowd before the end and should probably brace himself for some Lambert-mania over the coming days but, amid the eulogies, it should not overlook the deficiencies that were evident in another stodgy England performance.

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RomanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

serenade f pl

  1. plural of serenadă