Translingual edit

Symbol edit

pan

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-2 & ISO 639-3 language code for Punjabi.

English edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English panne, from Old English panne, from Proto-West Germanic *pannā, from Proto-Germanic *pannǭ, from Late Latin panna, from Latin patina (broad, shallow dish, pan, stewpan), from Ancient Greek πατάνη (patánē, kind of flat dish), which is probably from Pre-Greek.

Cognate with West Frisian panne, Saterland Frisian Ponne, Dutch pan, German Low German Panne, Pann, German Pfanne, Danish pande, Swedish panna, Icelandic panna.

Noun edit

pan (plural pans or (humorous) pen)

 
A pan (1)
  1. A wide, flat receptacle used around the house, especially for cooking.
  2. The contents of such a receptacle.
  3. A cylindrical receptacle about as tall as it is wide, with one long handle, usually made of metal, used for cooking in the home.
  4. (Ireland) A deep plastic receptacle, used for washing or food preparation; a basin.
  5. A wide receptacle in which gold grains are separated from gravel by washing the contents with water.
  6. (geography, geology) An expanse of level land located in a depression, especially
    1. A pond or lake, considered as the expanse of land upon which the water sits.
    2. (especially South Africa) A dry lake or playa, especially a salt flat.
    3. (South Africa) Synonym of playa lake: a temporary pond or lake in a playa.
    4. Short for salt pan: a flat artificial pond used for collecting minerals from evaporated water.
  7. (geology) Short for hardpan: a hard substrate such as is formed in pans.
  8. (geology, obsolete South Africa) Synonym of pipe: a channel for lava within a volcano; the cylindrical remains of such channels.
  9. Strong adverse criticism.
  10. A loaf of bread.
  11. (obsolete) The chamber pot in a close stool; (now) the base of a toilet, consisting of the bowl and its support.
  12. A bedpan.
    • 1977-1980, Lou Sullivan, personal diary, quoted in 2019, Ellis Martin, Zach Ozma (editors), We Both Laughed In Pleasure
      She yanks the pan out from under me & it spills all over the bed. Then she's got to change the sheets! Unreal.
  13. (slang) A human face, a mug.
    • 1946, George Johnston, Skyscrapers in the Mist, page 121:
      "He's a foreign-looking guy with thinnish black hair and a meaty sort of pan."
    • 1993, William S. Burroughs, edited by Oliver Harris, The Letters of William S. Burroughs, 1945–1959, New York: Penguin, →ISBN, page 92:
      Dave and I have parted company, and I hope I never see his junky pan again.
    • 1953, Raymond Chandler, The Long Goodbye, Penguin, published 2010, page 103:
      This was the kind of operator who would tell you to be there at nine sharp and if you weren't sitting quietly with a pleased smile on your pan when he floated in two hours later on a double Gibson, he would have a paroxysm of outraged executive ability […].
  14. (roofing) The bottom flat part of a roofing panel that is between the ribs of the panel.
  15. A closed vessel for boiling or evaporating as part of manufacture; a vacuum pan.
  16. (firearms) The part of a flintlock that holds the priming.
    flash in the pan
    • 1743, Robert Drury, The Pleasant, and Surprizing Adventures of Mr. Robert Drury, during his Fifteen Years Captivity on the Island of Madagascar[1], London, pages 95–96:
      [] he pull’d the Trigger, but Providence being pleas’d to preserve me for some other Purpose, the Cock snapp’d, and miss’d Fire. Whether the Prime was wet in the Pan, or by what other Miracle it was I escap’d his Fury, I cannot say []
    • 1863, Sheridan Le Fanu, The House by the Churchyard:
      And he [] glared on the cold pistols that hung before him—ready for anything. And he took down one with a snatch and weighed it in his hand, and fell to thinking again; and, as he did, kept opening and shutting the pan with a snap, []
  17. The skull, considered as a vessel containing the brain; the brainpan.
  18. (figurative) The brain, seen as one's intellect.
  19. (carpentry) A recess, or bed, for the leaf of a hinge.
  20. (music) Short for steelpan.
    • 2009, Pnina Werbner, Black and Ethnic Leaderships, page 122:
      The steel band transforms the people who play in it and dance to it, and fosters links between them. [] He learned to play the pan and filled in for absent members.
Synonyms edit
Hypernyms edit
Hyponyms edit
  • (expanse of flat land in a depression): flat
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit
  • ? Irish: panna
  • Japanese: パン
Translations edit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb edit

 
panned gold

pan (third-person singular simple present pans, present participle panning, simple past and past participle panned)

  1. (transitive) To wash in a pan (of earth, sand etc. when searching for gold).
    Coordinate term: sluice
    • 1875, William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs:
      We [] witnessed the process of cleaning up and panning out, which is the last process of separating the pure gold from the fine dirt and black sand.
  2. (transitive) To disparage; to belittle; to put down; to harshly criticize, especially a work (book, movie, etc.)
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:criticize
    • 2022 May 17, Tiffany Hsu, “All Those Celebrities Pushing Crypto Are Not So Vocal Now”, in The New York Times[2], →ISSN:
      Matt Damon, who compared the advent of virtual money to the development of aviation and spaceflight in a critically panned but widely seen Crypto.com ad last year, did not respond to requests to weigh in.
  3. (intransitive, with out, to pan out) To turn out well; to be successful.
  4. (transitive, informal, of a contest) To beat one's opposition convincingly.
Translations edit
See also edit
  • lavatory (place where gold is panned) (obsolete)

Etymology 2 edit

From a clipped form of panorama.

Verb edit

pan (third-person singular simple present pans, present participle panning, simple past and past participle panned)

  1. (intransitive, of a camera, etc.) To turn horizontally.
    • 2018 February, Robert Draper, “They are Watching You—and Everything Else on the Planet: Technology and Our Increasing Demand for Security have Put Us All under Surveillance. Is Privacy Becoming just a Memory?”, in National Geographic[3], Washington, D.C.: National Geographic Society, →ISSN, →OCLC, archived from the original on 14 June 2018:
      Later today in Finsbury Park, the cameras would spend hours panning across 35,000 festivalgoers in search of pickpockets, drunken brawlers, and other assorted agents of petty mischief.
  2. (intransitive, photography) To move the camera lens angle while continuing to expose the film, enabling a contiguous view and enrichment of context. In still-photography large-group portraits the film usually remains on a horizontal fixed plane as the lens and/or the film holder moves to expose the film laterally. The resulting image may extend a short distance laterally or as great as 360 degrees from the point where the film first began to be exposed.
  3. (intransitive, imaging) To shift an image relative to the display window without changing the viewing scale.
  4. (audio) To spread a sound signal into a new stereo or multichannel sound field, typically giving the impression that it is moving across the sound stage.
Coordinate terms edit
Derived terms edit
Translations edit
See also edit

Noun edit

pan (plural pans)

  1. A sequence in a film in which the camera pans over an area.
    • 2013, Monle Lee, Carla Johnson, Principles of Advertising: A Global Perspective, page 197:
      For instance, in the film Dances with Wolves, a pan of an uninhabited landscape contrasts the gruesome beginning footage that depicts the carnage of war.
Derived terms edit

Etymology 3 edit

Noun edit

pan (uncountable)

  1. Alternative form of paan

Etymology 4 edit

Compare French pan (skirt, lappet), Latin pannus (a cloth, rag). Doublet of pagne, pane, and pannus.

Verb edit

pan (third-person singular simple present pans, present participle panning, simple past and past participle panned)

  1. To join or fit together; to unite.
    • 31 May 1884, Leeds Mercury
      Pan it down—press an article into its proper place
    • 1963, Grower Talks:
      The plants can either be sold individually in the 3 inch pots as Valentine favors , or several may be panned together in larger pots

Etymology 5 edit

From Old English. See pane.

Noun edit

pan (plural pans)

  1. A part; a portion.
  2. (fortifications) The distance comprised between the angle of the epaule and the flanked angle.
  3. A leaf of gold or silver.

Etymology 6 edit

Clipping of pansexual or panromantic.

Adjective edit

pan (not comparable)

  1. (informal) Pansexual or panromantic.
    • 2012 December 28, Anna Waugh, “Texas got a pansexual legislator”, in Dallas Voice, volume 29, number 33, page 9:
      When she publicly acknowledged that she is pan, it educated citizens near and far on what that sexuality meant and the importance of being proud of who you are.
    • 2013, Alejandra Rodriguez, "Isn't That Bisexual?", Outwrite, Fall 2013, page 7:
      Another anonymous pansexual disclosed, "Sometimes I feel really left out because I'm pan. [] "
    • 2013, Megan Hertner, "Understanding Gender and Sexuality", Grapevine (Huron University College), December 2013, page 19:
      A similar experience is shared by individuals who identify their sexuality as pan, bi or queer.
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:pan.
Coordinate terms edit

Etymology 7 edit

Clipping of pantograph

Noun edit

pan (plural pans)

  1. (rail transport, informal) Short for pantograph.
Synonyms edit

See also edit

Anagrams edit

Afrikaans edit

Etymology edit

From Dutch pan, from Middle Dutch panne, from Old Dutch *panna, from Latin panna, contraction of patina. The sense “lake, pond” is likely borrowed from or influenced by English pan.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

pan (plural panne)

  1. pan (receptacle)
  2. lake or pond; pan

Synonyms edit

Aragonese edit

Etymology edit

From Latin pānis, pānem.

Noun edit

pan m

  1. bread

References edit

Asturian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin pānis, pānem.

Noun edit

pan m (plural panes)

  1. bread

Atong (India) edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Noun edit

pan (Bengali script পান)

  1. tree
  2. firewood

Etymology 2 edit

Classifier edit

pan- (Bengali script পান)

  1. used with apparatus, appliances, mechanical and electrical things, cars, bikes, bicycles, mortars and umbrellas

References edit

Bambara edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

pan

  1. to fly
  2. to jump

References edit

Bikol Central edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Spanish pan.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

pan (Basahan spelling ᜉᜈ᜔)

  1. bread (only used for naming)
    Synonym: tinapay

Related terms edit

Cebuano edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Spanish pan.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

pan (Badlit spelling ᜉᜈ᜔)

  1. bread
    Synonym: tinapay

Related terms edit

Chavacano edit

Etymology edit

From Spanish pan (bread).

Noun edit

pan

  1. bread

Chuukese edit

Noun edit

pan

  1. branch (with its leaves)

Cypriot Arabic edit

Root
p-y-n
2 terms

Etymology edit

From Arabicبَانَ(bāna).

Verb edit

pan I (present pipán) (intransitive)

  1. to seem
  2. to show up, to appear

References edit

  • Borg, Alexander (2004) A Comparative Glossary of Cypriot Maronite Arabic (Arabic–English) (Handbook of Oriental Studies; I.70), Leiden and Boston: Brill, page 171

Czech edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

pan m anim

  1. Alternative form of pán

Usage notes edit

  • This is the form used when followed by a name, title, occupation etc.
    pan NovákMr Novák
    Pane předsedo, dámy a pánové...Mr Chairman, ladies and gentlemen...
    Vítejte, pane rytíři.Welcome, Sir Knight.
    Kdy přijde pan doktor, sestřičko?When will the doctor come, nurse?

Declension edit

Further reading edit

  • pan in Kartotéka Novočeského lexikálního archivu
  • pan in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Dutch edit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Etymology edit

From Middle Dutch panne, from Old Dutch *panna, from Latin panna, contraction of patina.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

pan f (plural pannen, diminutive pannetje n)

  1. pan, especially for cooking
  2. (Netherlands) cooking pot
    Synonym: pot

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

Anagrams edit

French edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Inherited from Old French pan, from Latin pannus. Doublet of pagne.

Noun edit

pan m (plural pans)

  1. piece, part
    Synonyms: morceau, partie
    c’est un pan à partit's a special part
  2. side, face
  3. flap, lap (of coat)
  4. patch, area, section, sector

Etymology 2 edit

Onomatopoeic.

Interjection edit

pan

  1. bang! (sound of a gun)
    Pan! T’es mort !
    Bang! You're dead!
  2. bam!

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Friulian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin pānis, pānem.

Noun edit

pan m (plural pans)

  1. bread

Galician edit

 
Galician bread

Alternative forms edit

  • pão (reintegrationist)
  • pam (reintegrationist)

Etymology edit

From Old Galician-Portuguese pan, from Latin pānis, pānem. Cognate with Portuguese pão.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

pan m (plural pans)

  1. (uncountable) bread
    • 1418, Á. Rodríguez González (ed.), Libro do Concello de Santiago (1416-1422). Santiago de Compostela: Consello da Cultura Galega, page 95:
      que façan as paadeiras pan de dineiro que pese seis onças desque for cosido et que seja o dito pan bõo et ben cosido
      the bakers must make bread for a denarius that must weight six ounces once baked and said bread must be good and well baked
  2. a piece of bread
    Synonym: peza
  3. grain, corn, cereal
    • 1276, M. Lucas Álvarez, P. Lucas Dominguez, editors, El monasterio de San Clodio do Ribeiro en la Edad Media: estudio y documentos, Sada / A Coruña: Edicións do Castro, page 375:
      et este pan deue a seer qual o Deus der no logar et seer linpo de palla et de poo, d'eruellada et de mosceyra, et deue a seer ben seco et ben linpo et bõõ pan
      and this grain must be that that God gives at that place, and it must be clean of chaff and dust, of vetch and fodder, and it must be well dry and well clean and good grain
    • 1301, X. Ferro Couselo, editor, A vida e a fala dos devanceiros. Escolma de documentos en galego dos séculos XIII ao XVI, Vigo: Galaxia, page 52:
      A Eluira, I moyo de pan do nouo, de qual ouueren, e I bacoro
      To Elvira, one modius of grain of the new harvest, whichever they happen to have there, and one piglet
  4. (by extension) food

Related terms edit

References edit

  • pan” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006–2022.
  • pan” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • pan” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006–2013.
  • pan” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • pan” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Istriot edit

Etymology edit

From Latin pānis, pānem.

Noun edit

pan m

  1. bread

Japanese edit

Romanization edit

pan

  1. Rōmaji transcription of パン

Leonese edit

Etymology edit

From Latin pānis, pānem.

Noun edit

pan m

  1. bread

References edit

Ligurian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin pānis, pānem.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

pan m (invariable)

  1. bread

Lombard edit

Etymology edit

From Latin pānis, pānem.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

pan m (invariable)

  1. bread

Malay edit

Noun edit

pan

  1. grandmother

Mandarin edit

Romanization edit

pan

  1. Nonstandard spelling of pān.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of pán.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of pǎn.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of pàn.

Usage notes edit

  • Transcriptions of Mandarin into the Latin script often do not distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without indication of tone.

Middle English edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old English panne.

Noun edit

pan

  1. Alternative form of pane (pan)

Etymology 2 edit

From Old French pan, from Latin pannus.

Noun edit

pan

  1. Alternative form of pane (fabric, fur; a portion)

Occitan edit

Etymology edit

From Old Occitan pan, from Latin pānis, pānem.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

pan m (plural pans)

  1. bread

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Old French edit

Etymology edit

From Latin pannus.

Noun edit

pan oblique singularm (oblique plural pans, nominative singular pans, nominative plural pan)

  1. bit; piece; part
  2. (specifically) a piece of armor
    Et de l'hauberc li runpirent les pans
    They broke apart parts of his armor

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

References edit

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l’ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (pan)

Old Galician-Portuguese edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Latin pānem. Cognate with Old Spanish pan.

Noun edit

pan m

  1. bread

Descendants edit

  • Fala: pan
  • Galician: pan
  • Portuguese: pão (see there for further descendants)

Further reading edit

Old Polish edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *gъpanъ. First attested in the 13th century. Displaced gospodzin.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): (10th–15th CE) /paːn/
  • IPA(key): (15th CE) /pɒn/

Noun edit

pan m ? (female equivalent pani or panna)

  1. lord (master of a feudal manor)
    • 1881-1882 [1293], Max Perlbach, editor, Pommerellisches Urkundenbuch[4], page 451:
      Pan Andreas castellanus Danensis
      [Pan Andreas castellanus Danensis]
    • 1959 [1399], Henryk Kowalewicz, Władysław Kuraszkiewicz, editors, Wielkopolskie roty sądowe XIV-XV wieku, Roty poznańskie, volume I, number 368:
      Esze Boguchna otkaszala Potrkovi dacz swego posagu panu posnanskemu trzinaczcze grziwni
      [Eże Boguchna otkazała Piotrkowi dać swego posagu panu poznańskiemu trzynaćcie grzywny]
  2. ducal or princely official
    • 1874 [1275], Monumenta Medii Aevi Historica res gestas Poloniae illustrantia. Pomniki Dziejowe Wieków Średnich do objaśnienia rzeczy polskich służące, volume IX, page 136:
      Omnesque eius (sc. monasterii) villas... cum... incolis... a domino custodie, qui dicitur vlg. pan stroze vel stroznj, semper facimus liberos
      [Omnesque eius (sc. monasterii) villas... cum... incolis... a domino custodie, qui dicitur vlg. pan stroże vel strożny, semper facimus liberos]
  3. (more specifically) beaver official (ducal lord or acting official in charge of beavers, the mammal)
    Synonym: bobrownik
    • 1874 [1275], Monumenta Medii Aevi Historica res gestas Poloniae illustrantia. Pomniki Dziejowe Wieków Średnich do objaśnienia rzeczy polskich służące, volume IX, page 136:
      Dominus castorum dictus wlgo pan bobrowi
      [Dominus castorum dictus wlgo pan bobrowi]
  4. dignitary
    • 1864 [14th/15th century], August Bielowski, editor, Monumenta Poloniae Historica. Pomniki Dziejowe Polski[5], volume II, page 468:
      Dicitur pan in Slavonico maior dominus... Xandz autem maior est quam pan, veluti princeps et superior rex
      [Dicitur pan in Slavonico maior dominus... Ksiądz autem maior est quam pan, veluti princeps et superior rex]
    • Beginning of the 15th century, Kazania gnieźnieńskie[6], page 11b:
      A *szaprafdocz na tem tho svecze malo takich kaplanof nadze ('najdzie')..., chos bycz ony krole, xøszøtha y tesze pany bogathe o gich sloscz karaly ge
      [A zaprawdęć na tem to świecie mało takich kapłanow nadzie ('najdzie')..., coż być oni krole, książęta y teże pany bogate o jich złość karali je]
    • 1885 [c. 15th century], Jan Baudouina de Courtenay, Jan Karłowicz, Antoni Adam Kryńskiego, Malinowski Lucjan, editors, Prace Filologiczne[7], volume III, page 289:
      Czelny panowye barones
      [Czelni panowie barones]
  5. dignitary of property
  6. (military) cavalry officer
    • 1874-1891 [Fifteenth century], Rozprawy i Sprawozdania z Posiedzeń Wydziału Filologicznego Akademii Umiejętności, volume XLVII, page 359:
      Filius tribuni chorøsznego pana
      [Filius tribuni chorążnego pana]
  7. nobleman
    • 1930 [Fifteenth century], “Judith”, in Ludwik Bernacki, editor, Biblia królowej Zofii (Biblia szaroszpatacka)[9], section 5,26:
      Y stalo syø gdisz Achior przestal mowyenya slow swich, roznyewaly syø wszitcy wyelyci panowye (omnes magnates) Olofernovy
      [I stało się gdyż Achior przestał mowienia słow swych, rozniewali się wszytcy wielicy panowie (omnes magnates) Olofernowi]
    • 1908 [c. 1500], Bolesław Erzepki, editor, Przyczynki do średniowiecznego słownictwa polskiego. I. Glosy polskie wpisane do łacińsko-niemieckiego słownika drukowanego w roku 1490[10], page 62:
      Optimas stoleczny pan
      [Optimas stołeczny pan]
  8. (in the plural, law) court officials
    • 1959 [1398], Henryk Kowalewicz, Władysław Kuraszkiewicz, editors, Wielkopolskie roty sądowe XIV-XV wieku, Roty poznańskie, volume I, number 362:
      Iako Sandziuoy starosta wmovil medzi mnø a medzi Sczepanem, esz ne mal na mø niyednego roku stacz nisz przet timi pani, czso sø nameneni
      [Jako Sędziwoj starosta umowił miedzy mną a miedzy Szczepanem, eż nie miał na mię nijednego roku stać niż przed tymi pany, czso są namienieni]
  9. lord (one possessing similar mastery over others; any feudal superior generally; any nobleman or aristocrat; any chief, prince, or sovereign ruler)
    • 1959 [1398], Henryk Kowalewicz, Władysław Kuraszkiewicz, editors, Wielkopolskie roty sądowe XIV-XV wieku, Roty poznańskie, volume I, number 381:
      Yssze Marczin ne odmouil Yana szoltisa od rok za swego pana, za Wolwrama
      [Iże Marcin nie odmowił Jana sołtysa od rok za swego pana, za Wolwrama]
    • 1967 [1424], Henryk Kowalewicz, Władysław Kuraszkiewicz, editors, Wielkopolskie roty sądowe XIV-XV wieku, Roty kościańskie, volume III, number 1048:
      Jaco pan dzedziczny Dzbansky dal Janowy mlin czynicz w dzedzyczstwo
      [Jako pan dziedziczny Dzbąski dał Janowi młyn czynić w dziedzicstwo]
    • 1885 [c. 1428], Jan Baudouina de Courtenay, Jan Karłowicz, Antoni Adam Kryńskiego, Malinowski Lucjan, editors, Prace Filologiczne[11], volume I, page 487:
      Dobrowolne panowe ffeodales
      [Dobrowolne panowie ffeodales]
    • 1875 [Fifteenth century], Zygmunt Celichowski, editor, Słowniczek łacińsko- polski wyrazów prawa magdeburskiego z wieku XV. Przedruk homograficzny z kodeksu kórnickiego[12], page 7:
      Liber (sc. dominus) wolny pan
      [Liber (sc. dominus) wolny pan]
  10. title of respect or formality often used with nobility or officials
    • 1959 [1395], Henryk Kowalewicz, Władysław Kuraszkiewicz, editors, Wielkopolskie roty sądowe XIV-XV wieku, Roty poznańskie, volume I, number 187:
      Tedi *rzegk pan Hinczka
      [Tedy rzek[ł] pan Hynczka]
    • 1959 [1395], Henryk Kowalewicz, Władysław Kuraszkiewicz, editors, Wielkopolskie roty sądowe XIV-XV wieku, Roty poznańskie, volume I, number 187:
      Jako do Vtroszina... przigeli, taco rzecli gednacze pana Hinczkoui
      [Jako do [J]utroszyna... przyjeli, tako rzekli jednacze pana Hynczkowi]
    • 1959 [1399], Henryk Kowalewicz, Władysław Kuraszkiewicz, editors, Wielkopolskie roty sądowe XIV-XV wieku, Roty poznańskie, volume I, number 378:
      Pani Poluiczska Hanka ma postauicz zachoczczø przecziw Potraszoui Czepurskemu pana choranszego Paska
      [Pani Polwicska Hanka ma postawić zachodźcę przeciw Piotraszowi Czepurskiemu pana chorążego Paszka]
    • 1959 [1400], Henryk Kowalewicz, Władysław Kuraszkiewicz, editors, Wielkopolskie roty sądowe XIV-XV wieku, Roty poznańskie, volume I, number 433:
      Iaco to swatczø, iz pan sandza o tø rzecz alisz po trzech *ledzech zalowal na Troyana
      [Jako to świadczę, iż pan sędzia o tę rzecz aliż po trzech leciech żałował na Trojana]
    • 1959 [1401], Henryk Kowalewicz, Władysław Kuraszkiewicz, editors, Wielkopolskie roty sądowe XIV-XV wieku, Roty poznańskie, volume I, number 522:
      Iacom sø ne zamowil prze[d] pani Czarnkowskimi Janoui praw bich (leg. być) *vsm krziwen
      [Jakom się nie zamowił prze[d] pany Czarnkowskimi Janowi praw być ośm krzywien]
    • 1959 [1411], Henryk Kowalewicz, Władysław Kuraszkiewicz, editors, Wielkopolskie roty sądowe XIV-XV wieku, Roty poznańskie, volume I, number 835:
      Yaco gdy pan Jan Czepurski wyprawil Splawskego s gysczyny, tedi go ne gabal prawem, asz trsy latha mynøly
      [Jaco gdy pan Jan Czepurski wyprawił Spławskiego z jiściny, tedy go nie gabał prawem, aż trzy lata minęły]
    • 1959 [1419], Henryk Kowalewicz, Władysław Kuraszkiewicz, editors, Wielkopolskie roty sądowe XIV-XV wieku, Roty poznańskie, volume I, number 979:
      Yaco Newstąmp Swekoczsky szedl na pana Janową lanka Potrowskego gwaltem
      [Jako Nieustęp Świekocski szedł na pana Janowę łąkę Piotrowskiego gwałtem]
    • 1959 [1422], Henryk Kowalewicz, Władysław Kuraszkiewicz, editors, Wielkopolskie roty sądowe XIV-XV wieku, Roty poznańskie, volume I, number 1117:
      Ysze pąn Jaroslaw sz Lubacowa, podkomorze, ne yest vinouat... czterdczesczy grzyven... sza woly
      [Iże pan Jarosław z Lubiatowa, podkomorze, nie jest winowat... czterdzieści grzywien... za woły]
    • 1895 [1448–1450], Franciszek Piekosiński, editor, Tłumaczenia polskie statutów ziemskich, Kodeks Świętosławów, page 72:
      Vstawyenye przes oswyeczonego ksządza pana Wlodzyslawa (per serenissimum regem Vladislaum), krola polskego, ... w Krakowye... wywolane
      [Ustawienie przez oświeconego księdza pana Włodzisława (per serenissimum regem Vladislaum), krola polskiego, ... w Krakowie... wywołane]
  11. lord, master (male head of a household, a father or husband)
    • 1939 [end of the 14th century], Ryszard Ganszyniec, Witold Taszycki, Stefan Kubica, Ludwik Bernacki, editors, Psałterz florjański łacińsko-polsko-niemiecki [Latin-Polish-German Florian Psalter]‎[13], Zakład Narodowy imienia Ossolińskich, z zasiłkiem Sejmu Śląskiego [The Ossoliński National Institute: with the benefit of the Silesian Parliament], page 104:
      Postawil gyey panem (constituit eum dominum) domu swego y ksødzem wszego bydla swego
      [Postawił jej panem (constituit eum dominum) domu swego i księdzem wszego bydła swego]
    • 1853 [Fifteenth century], Wacław Aleksander Maciejowski, editor, Piśmiennictwo polskie od czasów najdawniejszych aż do roku 1830, volume 4, page 44:
      Ktho tho wsdruschy, dyabel bandzye pan gego duschi
      [Kto to wzdruszy, diabeł będzie pan jego duszy]
  12. husband (male member of a marriage)
    Synonym: mąż
    • 1959 [1386], Henryk Kowalewicz, Władysław Kuraszkiewicz, editors, Wielkopolskie roty sądowe XIV-XV wieku, Roty poznańskie, volume I, number 4:
      Item domina de Czepury prestabit iuramentum...: Jaco yest moy pan ne uinouat Sulcoui trzinaczcze grziwen za Czepuri
      [Item domina de Czepury prestabit iuramentum...: Jako jest moj pan nie winowat Sułkowi trzynaćcie grzywien za Czepury]
  13. Lord (title of God)
    • 1939 [end of the 14th century], Ryszard Ganszyniec, Witold Taszycki, Stefan Kubica, Ludwik Bernacki, editors, Psałterz florjański łacińsko-polsko-niemiecki [Latin-Polish-German Florian Psalter]‎[14], Zakład Narodowy imienia Ossolińskich, z zasiłkiem Sejmu Śląskiego [The Ossoliński National Institute: with the benefit of the Silesian Parliament], page 102:
      Blogoslawcze panv (domino) wszyczki syly yego
      [Błogosławcie Panu (domino) wszyćki siły jego]

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

adjectives
nouns
verbs

Descendants edit

References edit

Old Spanish edit

Etymology edit

From Latin panis.

Noun edit

pan m (plural panes)

  1. bread
    • c. 1200, Cantar de mio Cid:
      Del agua fezist vino e dela piedra pan,
      Of the water Thou madest wine and of the stone bread,

Descendants edit

  • Ladino: pan
  • Spanish: pan (see there for further descendants)

Papiamentu edit

 

Etymology edit

From Spanish pan.

Noun edit

pan

  1. bread

Piedmontese edit

Etymology edit

From Latin pānis, pānem.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

pan m

  1. bread

Pochutec edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Spanish pan.

Noun edit

pan

  1. bread

References edit

Polish edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old Polish pan.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

pan m pers (female equivalent pani, abbreviation p. or pp.)

  1. gentleman, man (specific male person, especially one unknown to the speaker)
    Jakiś pan mi pomógł.A certain gentleman helped me.
  2. master, lord (person with power over something)
  3. sir (rich, well-presenting person)
    Synonym: panisko
  4. lord (master of a house)
  5. teacher
    Synonym: nauczyciel
  6. master (owner of a household pet)
  7. Mr, mister (title before a last name)
  8. (Middle Polish) husband (male member of a marriage)
    Synonym: mąż
  9. (Middle Polish) protector
    Synonym: protektor
  10. (Middle Polish) owner
    Synonym: właściciel

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

adjectives
adverb
nouns
verbs

Descendants edit

Pronoun edit

pan m (feminine pani)

  1. you polite second person m-personal nominative, it takes verbs as third-person sg form
    Coordinate terms: pani, państwo
    Czy mógłby pan zamknąć drzwi?Could you close the door?

Declension edit

See also edit

Trivia edit

According to Słownik frekwencyjny polszczyzny współczesnej (1990), pan is one of the most used words in Polish, appearing 7 times in scientific texts, 10 times in news, 12 times in essays, 373 times in fiction, and 1417 times in plays, each out of a corpus of 100,000 words, totaling 1819 times, making it the 22nd most common word in a corpus of 500,000 words.[1]

References edit

  1. ^ Ida Kurcz (1990), “pan”, in Słownik frekwencyjny polszczyzny współczesnej [Frequency dictionary of the Polish language] (in Polish), volume 1, Kraków; Warszawa: Polska Akademia Nauk. Instytut Języka Polskiego, page 354

Further reading edit

  • pan in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • pan in Polish dictionaries at PWN
  • pan”, in Słownik Polszczyzny XVI Wieku [A Dictionary of 16th Century Polish], 2010-2023
  • PAN”, in Elektroniczny Słownik Języka Polskiego XVII i XVIII Wieku [Electronic Dictionary of the Polish Language of the XVII and XVIII Century], 19.11.2009
  • Samuel Bogumił Linde (1807–1814), “pan”, in Słownik języka polskiego
  • Aleksander Zdanowicz (1861), “pan”, in Słownik języka polskiego, Wilno 1861
  • A. Kryński, W. Niedźwiedzki, editors (1908), “pan”, in Słownik języka polskiego (in Polish), volume 4, Warsaw, page 30
  • pan in Narodowy Fotokorpus Języka Polskiego

Romansch edit

Alternative forms edit

  • paun (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Puter)
  • pàn (Sutsilvan)
  • pang (Surmiran)

Etymology edit

From Latin pānis, pānem.

Noun edit

pan m (plural pans)

  1. (Vallader, uncountable) bread
  2. (Vallader, countable) loaf of bread

Scots edit

Verb edit

pan (third-person singular simple present pans, present participle pannin, simple past panned, past participle panned)

  1. (slang) break, smash (particularly of windows)
    Eh'm gonnae pan yer windaes in!I'm going to smash your windows!

Southwestern Dinka edit

Noun edit

pan

  1. home, homestead, compound, abode, village, country

References edit

  • Dinka-English Dictionary[15], 2005

Spanish edit

 
Pan
 
Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

Etymology edit

Inherited from Latin pānem whence English pantry and company. Compare Catalan pa, French pain, Galician pan, Italian pane, Occitan pan, Portuguese pão, Romanian pâine, possibly from Proto-Indo-European *peh₂- (to feed, to graze).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpan/ [ˈpãn]
  • Rhymes: -an
  • Syllabification: pan

Noun edit

pan m (plural panes)

  1. bread
    Para mi desayuno, tomo pan y leche.
    For my breakfast, I have bread and milk.
  2. bun (e.g. the kinds used for a hamburger or hot dog)
  3. (figurative) money, dough
  4. (figurative) work, job

Hyponyms edit

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

Further reading edit

Venetian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin pānis, pānem. Compare Italian pane and Neapolitan pane.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

pan m (plural pani)

  1. bread

Welsh edit

Etymology edit

Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *kʷos, *kʷis. See also Scottish Gaelic cuin, Latin quando, Proto-Germanic *hwan (when).[1]

Pronunciation edit

Conjunction edit

pan

  1. when, while
    Synonyms: amser, pryd

Mutation edit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
pan ban mhan phan
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References edit

  1. ^ Matasović, Ranko (2009) Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN

Yogad edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Spanish pan (bread).

Noun edit

pan

  1. bread

Zou edit

Adjective edit

pan

  1. thin

References edit

  • Lukram Himmat Singh (2013) A Descriptive Grammar of Zou, Canchipur: Manipur University, page 45