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See also: clérical

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin clēricālis (clerical), from clēricus (clergyman, priest).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈklɛɹɪkəl/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

clerical (not comparable)

  1. Of or relating to clerks or their work.
    • 1902, Joseph Conrad, chapter I, in Heart of Darkness:
      ‘The groans of this sick person,’ he said, ‘distract my attention. And without that it is extremely difficult to guard against clerical errors in this climate.’
  2. Of or relating to the clergy.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

clerical (plural clericals)

  1. A member of the clergy.

Further readingEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin clēricālis (clerical), from clēricus (clergyman, priest).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

clerical (plural clericais, comparable)

  1. clerical

SpanishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

clerical (plural clericales)

  1. clerical