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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French coefficient. Coined by French mathematician François Viète. Or influenced by (New) Latin coefficient-, which is the stem of coefficiens, which is a substantivation of the present active participle of coefficere, which comes from co- and efficere.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˌkəʊ.ɪˈfɪʃn̩t/, /ˌkəʊ.iˈfɪʃn̩t/

AdjectiveEdit

coefficient (comparative more coefficient, superlative most coefficient)

  1. cooperating
    • 1850, August Neander, The Life of Jesus Christ in Its Historical Connexion and Historical ..., page 13
      And so our own idea of Christ compels us to admit that two factors, the one natural, the other supernatural, were coefficient in his entrance into human life;
    • 2005, Mathew Callahan, Boff Whalley, The Trouble with Music, page 12
      Nevertheless, there was some substance to the notion that acclaim and merit were coefficient.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

coefficient (plural coefficients)

  1. (mathematics) A constant by which an algebraic term is multiplied.
  2. A number, value or item that serves as a measure of some property or characteristic.

HyponymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

coefficient m (plural coefficients)

  1. coefficient

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit