See also: ítem

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English item, from Latin item (also; in the same manner). The present English meaning derives from a usage in lists, where the first entry would begin in primis (“firstly”) or imprimis, and the other entries with item (also, moreover). Later, people less familiar with Latin, seeing such lists, took the word "item" as meaning "a member of a list".

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈaɪtəm/
    • (US) IPA(key): [ˈaɪ̯ɾəm], [ˈaɪ̯ɾm̩]
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: item

NounEdit

item (plural items)

  1. A distinct physical object.
    Tweezers are great for manipulating small items.
  2. (by extension, video games) An object that can be picked up for later use.
  3. A line of text having a legal or other meaning; a separate particular in an account.
    the items in a bill
    In response to the first item, we deny all wrongdoing.
  4. (psychometrics) A question on a test, which may include its answers.
    The exam has 100 items, each of which includes a correct response and three distractors.
  5. A matter for discussion in an agenda.
    The first item for discussion is the budget for next year's picnic.
  6. (informal) Two people who are having a relationship with each other.
    Jack and Jill are an item.
  7. A short article in a newspaper.
    an item concerning the weather
  8. (obsolete) A hint; an innuendo.
    • (Can we date this quote by Thomas Fuller and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      A secret item was given to some of the bishops [] to absent themselves.

SynonymsEdit

  • (object): article, object, thing
  • (line of text having a legal or semantic meaning):
  • (matter for discussion): subject, topic
  • (two people who are having a relationship with each other): couple
  • (psychometrics): test/assessment question

HyponymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

item (third-person singular simple present items, present participle iteming, simple past and past participle itemed)

  1. (transitive) To make a note of.

Related termsEdit

AdverbEdit

item (not comparable)

  1. likewise

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin.

AdverbEdit

item

  1. same; in the same way

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin item.

AdverbEdit

item

  1. (law) in the same way.

Etymology 2Edit

From English item, from Latin item.

NounEdit

item m (invariable)

  1. (computer science) A single programmed unit.
  2. (linguistics) An element of a grammatical or lexical set.

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *éy and *só. Compare ita and itidem.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

item (not comparable)

  1. just like (in a comparison)
    • c. 200 BCE – 190 BCE, Plautus, Captivi 5.4:
      HĒGIŌ. Salvē, exoptāte gnāte mī. TYNDARUS. Hem, quid 'gnāte mī'?
      Attat, sciō quor tē patrem assimules esse et mē fīlium:
      quia mī item ut parentēs lūcis dās tuendī cōpiam.
      HEGIO. Hello, my wished-for son. TYNDARUS. Huh, what 'my son'?
      Alas, I know why you're like a father and I like a son:
      because you gave me the means to see the light, just like parents do.
    • 106 BCE – 43 BCE, Cicero, Orator 60:
      Ita fit ut nōn item in ōrātiōne ut in versū numerus exstet, idque quod numerōsum in ōrātiōne dīcitur nōn semper numerō fīat, sed nōnnunquam aut concinnitāte aut cōnstructiōne verbōrum.
      So it turns out that there isn't a metre in prose just like in verse, and that which in oration is called 'metrical' is not always caused by metre, but also on occasion by the euphony and construction of the words.

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin item.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

item

  1. also, and this.

ReferencesEdit

NounEdit

item

  1. the same; identical.

DescendantsEdit

  • English: item
  • Scots: eetem

ReferencesEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin.

AdverbEdit

item

  1. same; in the same way

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin.

AdverbEdit

item

  1. same; in the same way

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin item (also; in the same manner).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

item m (plural itens)

  1. item
  2. A matter for discussion in an agenda or elsewhere.
    O primeiro item a considerar é o orçamento para o próximo piquenique.
    The first point to consider is the budget for the next picnic.
  3. A line of text with some meaning.
    Consideremos um item de cada vez.
    Let's look at one item at a time.