contiguity

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French contiguïté, from Late Latin contiguitās, from Latin contiguus (bordering upon), from contingō (I touch or border upon).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kɒntɪˈgjuːɪti/

NounEdit

contiguity (plural contiguities)

  1. A state in which two or more physical objects are physically touching one another or in which sections of a plane border on one another.
    • 1958–1960, R.S. Peters, The Concept of Motivation, Routledge & Kegan Paul (second edition), chapter i: “Types of Explanation in Psychological Theories”, page 12:
      In the mechanical conception of ‘cause’ it is…demanded that there should be spatial and temporal contiguity between the movements involved.

SynonymsEdit

  • (state in which objects are physically touching): synapse (of neurons)[1]

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Medical Physiology, Boron & Boulpaep, ISBN 1-4160-2328-3, Elsevier Saunders 2005. Updated edition. page 295.
Last modified on 19 March 2014, at 21:34