contrition

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Old French contriciun (French contrition), from Latin contrītiō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

contrition (countable and uncountable, plural contritions)

  1. The state of being contrite; sincere penitence or remorse.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:remorse
    • 2020 November 30, Erica Gonzales, “'The Undoing' Viewers Are Trolling Their Finale Theories”, in Harper's Bazaar[1]:
      Jonathan's mother told Grace on a recent phone call that Jonathan showed no sign of remorse or contrition for his own sister's passing.
    • 2021 January 12, James Dobbins; Annie Karni, “Trump Shows No Contrition for Inciting Mob, Calling Remarks ‘Appropriate’”, in The New York Times[2], ISSN 0362-4331:
      President Trump on Tuesday showed no contrition or regret for instigating the mob that stormed the Capitol and threatened the lives of members of Congress and his vice president, saying that his remarks to a rally beforehand were “totally appropriate” and that the effort by Congress to impeach and convict him was “causing tremendous anger.”
  2. (obsolete) The act of grinding or rubbing to powder.
    Synonyms: attrition, friction, rubbing

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kɔ̃.tʁi.sjɔ̃/
  • (file)

NounEdit

contrition f (plural contritions)

  1. remorse, contrition
    Synonyms: componction, remords

Further readingEdit