English

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Etymology

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converse +‎ -er.

Noun

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converser (plural conversers)

  1. One who converses.
    • 1850, R[alph] W[aldo] Emerson, “Plato; or, The Philosopher”, in Representative Men: Seven Lectures, Boston, Mass.: Phillips, Sampson and Company, [], page 58:
      If he made transcendental distinctions, he fortified himself by drawing all his illustrations from sources disdained by orators and polite conversers; from mares and puppies; from pitchers and soup-ladles; from cooks and criers; the shops of potters, horse-doctors, butchers, and fishmongers.

Anagrams

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French

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Latin conversārī.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /kɔ̃.vɛʁ.se/
  • Audio:(file)

Verb

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converser

  1. (intransitive, literary) to converse
    Synonyms: deviser, discuter, s’entretenir

Conjugation

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Derived terms

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Descendants

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  • German: konversieren

Further reading

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Latin

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Verb

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converser

  1. first-person singular present passive subjunctive of conversō

Old French

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Etymology

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Learned borrowing from Latin conversō.

Verb

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converser

  1. to converse (discuss; talk; speak)
    • c. 1176, Chrétien de Troyes, Cligès:
      Ce fut fantosme, se devient, qui antre nos a conversé
      This was a ghost, it turns out, who spoke among us

Conjugation

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This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. The forms that would normally end in *-ss, *-st are modified to s, st. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

Descendants

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