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See also: Converse and conversé

Contents

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French converser, from Latin conversor (live, have dealings with)

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

converse (third-person singular simple present converses, present participle conversing, simple past and past participle conversed)

  1. (formal, intransitive) to talk; to engage in conversation
  2. to keep company; to hold intimate intercourse; to commune; followed by with
    • (Can we date this quote by Thomson?)
      To seek the distant hills, and there converse / With nature.
    • (Can we date this quote by Sir Walter Scott?)
    • 1820, William Wordsworth, Ivanhoe Chapter 4
      Conversing with the world, we use the world's fashions.
      But to converse with heaven — This is not easy.
  3. (obsolete) to have knowledge of (a thing), from long intercourse or study
    • (Can we date this quote by John Locke?)
      according as the objects they converse with afford greater or less variety
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

converse

  1. (now literary) familiar discourse; free interchange of thoughts or views; conversation; chat.
    • 1728, Edward Young, Love of Fame, the Universal Passion, Satire V, On Women, lines 44-46:
      Twice ere the sun descends, with zeal inspir'd, / From the vain converse of the world retir'd, / She reads the psalms and chapters for the day []
    • 1919, Saki, ‘The Disappearance of Crispina Umerleigh’, The Toys of Peace, Penguin 2000 (Complete Short Stories), p. 405:
      In a first-class carriage of a train speeding Balkanward across the flat, green Hungarian plain, two Britons sat in friendly, fitful converse.

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin conversus (turned around), past participle of converto (turn about)

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

converse (not comparable)

  1. opposite; reversed in order or relation; reciprocal
    a converse proposition

NounEdit

converse (plural converses)

  1. the opposite or reverse
  2. (logic) of a proposition or theorem of the form: given that "If A is true, then B is true", then "If B is true, then A is true."
    equivalently: given that "All Xs are Ys", then "All Ys are Xs".
    All trees are plants, but the converse, that all plants are trees, is not true.
  3. (semantics) one of a pair of terms that name or describe a relationship from opposite perspectives; converse antonym; relational antonym
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

ItalianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

converse

  1. third-person singular past historic of convergere

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

ParticipleEdit

converse

  1. vocative masculine singular of conversus

PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

converse

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of conversar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of conversar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of conversar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of conversar

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /komˈberse/, [kõmˈberse]

VerbEdit

converse

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of conversar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of conversar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of conversar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of conversar.