converso

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Spanish converso.

NounEdit

converso (plural conversos)

  1. (history) A Jew or Muslim in Spain or Portugal who converted to Roman Catholicism under duress, particularly during the 14th and 15th centuries.
    • 2007 January 20, Sam Roberts, “New Favor for a Name That Straddles Cultures”:
      Guillermina Jasso, a sociology professor at New York University , said Angel was “evocative of the old converso practice of taking on very Christian surnames as a way of survival in a suspicious environment.”
    • 2009, Diarmaid MacCulloch, A History of Christianity, Penguin 2010, p. 672-3:
      In the Inquisition's terms, both were automatically suspect by the fact that their families were conversos, and they might be seen as emerging from that maelstrom of religious energy released by the religious realignment of Spain in the 1490s.

See alsoEdit


CatalanEdit

VerbEdit

converso

  1. First-person singular present indicative form of conversar.

ItalianEdit

VerbEdit

converso

  1. first-person singular indicative present of conversare
  2. past participle of convergere

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

present active conversō, present infinitive conversāre, perfect active conversāvī, supine conversātum

  1. I turn around or over
  2. I ponder
  3. I consort or associate with
  4. I abide or dwell

InflectionEdit

ParticipleEdit

conversō

  1. dative masculine singular of conversus
  2. dative neuter singular of conversus
  3. ablative masculine singular of conversus
  4. ablative neuter singular of conversus

PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

converso

  1. first-person singular present indicative of conversar

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

converso

  1. First-person singular (yo) present indicative form of conversar.
Last modified on 15 April 2014, at 15:13