EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Old French corbe, from Latin curvus.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

corbe (comparative more corbe, superlative most corbe)

  1. (obsolete) crooked
    • 1579, Immeritô [pseudonym; Edmund Spenser], “Februarie. Aegloga Se[c]unda.”, in The Shepheardes Calender: [], London: [] Hugh Singleton, [], OCLC 606515406; republished as The Shepheardes Calender [], London: [] Iohn Wolfe for Iohn Harrison the yonger, [], 1586, OCLC 837880809:
      I deeme thy braine emperished bee
      Through rusty elde, that hath rotted thee:
      Or sicker thy head veray tottie is,
      So on thy corbe shoulder it leanes amisse.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for corbe in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)


ItalianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

corbe f

  1. plural of corba (large wicker basket)

Etymology 2Edit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

corbe f

  1. plural of corba (exostosis of a horse's hock)

LatinEdit

NounEdit

corbe

  1. ablative singular of corbis