hock

See also: Hock

Contents

EnglishEdit

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Etymology 1Edit

From hockamore, from the name of the German town of Hochheim am Main.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hock ‎(countable and uncountable, plural hocks)

  1. A Rhenish wine, of a light yellow color, either sparkling or still, from the Hochheim region; often applied to all Rhenish wines.

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English hoch, hough, hocke, from Old English hōh, from Proto-Germanic *hanhaz (compare West Frisian hakke, Dutch hak, Low German Hack), from Proto-Indo-European *kenk (compare Lithuanian kìnka ‘leg, thigh, knee-cap’, kenklė̃ ‘knee-cap’, Sanskrit कङ्काल ‎(kaṅkāla) ‘skeleton’)

NounEdit

hock ‎(plural hocks)

  1. The tarsal joint of a digitigrade quadruped, such as a horse, pig or dog.
  2. Meat from that part of a food animal.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

hock ‎(third-person singular simple present hocks, present participle hocking, simple past and past participle hocked)

  1. (transitive) To disable by cutting the tendons of the hock; to hamstring; to hough.

Etymology 3Edit

From English phrase in hock circa 1855-60, from Dutch hok ‎(hutch, hovel, jail, pen, doghouse). [1]

VerbEdit

hock ‎(third-person singular simple present hocks, present participle hocking, simple past and past participle hocked)

  1. (transitive, colloquial) To leave with a pawnbroker as security for a loan.
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

hock ‎(uncountable)

  1. Pawn, obligation as collateral for a loan.
    He needed $750 to get his guitar out of hock at the pawnshop.
    • 2012 April 25, Patty Murphy, “Business bulletin”, Associated Press, page 10A:
      But Ford Motor Co. needs another agency, either Standard & Poor's or Moody's, to make the same upgrade before it can get its blue oval logo, factories and other assets out of hock.
  2. Debt.
    They were in hock to the bank for $35 million.
  3. Installment purchase.
    • 2007, Tara Hanks, The Mmm Girl: Marilyn Monroe, by Herself, page 28:
      Later, Uncle Doc bought a couch on hock, then a bed.
  4. Prison.
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=hock

Etymology 4Edit

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Wikipedia

Yiddish האַק ‎(hak), imperative singular form of האַקן ‎(hakn, to knock), from the idiomatic expression האַק מיר נישט קיין טשײַניק ‎(hak mir nisht keyn tshaynik, don't knock a teakettle at me)

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

hock ‎(third-person singular simple present hocks, present participle hocking, simple past and past participle hocked)

  1. (US) To bother; to pester; to annoy incessantly

AnagramsEdit

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