Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From country +‎ -fy

VerbEdit

countrify ‎(third-person singular simple present countrifies, present participle countrifying, simple past and past participle countrified)

  1. (transitive) To make rural or rustic.
    • 1759, James Townley, High Life Below Stairs: A Farce of Two Acts[1]:
      Never fear, I'll be so countrify'd that you shall not know me.
    • 1916, Albert Shaw, editor, The American Review of Reviews[2], volume 54, page 69:
      This tendency to move away from crowded centers of population, with their congested apartment life, to the country and small towns where the laborer and his family may have cheap breathing space—in other words, this countrifying of industries—is growing more and more evident.
    • 2004, Gene Santoro, Highway 61 Revisited: The Tangled Roots of American Jazz, Blues, Rock, & Country Music[3], page 183:
      Even whitebread folk-rockers like the Byrds were, thanks to Gram Parsons, countrifying soul hits like “You Don't Miss Your Water.”

AntonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • countrify” (US) / “countrify” (UK) in Oxford Dictionaries, Oxford University Press.
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