dendrite

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek δενδρίτης (dendrítēs, of or pertaining to a tree). Equivalent to dendr- +‎ -ite.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dendrite (plural dendrites)

  1. (cytology) A slender projection of a nerve cell which conducts nerve impulses from a synapse to the body of the cell; a dendron.
    • 1970, Saul Bellow, Mr. Sammler’s Planet, Greenwich, CT: Fawcett, 1971, Chapter 1, pp. 12-13,[1]
      Little copses of television antennas. Whiplike, graceful thrilling metal dendrites drawing images from the air, bringing brotherhood, communion to immured apartment people.
    • 1979, Carl Sagan, “Can We Know the Universe? Reflections on a Grain of Salt” in John Carey (ed.), Eyewitness to Science, Harvard University Press, 1997, p. 437,[2]
      A typical brain neuron has perhaps a thousand little wires, called dendrites, which connect it with its fellows.
  2. (cytology) Slender cell process emanating from the cell bodies of dendritic cells and follicular dendritic cells of the immune system.
  3. (crystallography, metallurgy) Tree-like structure of crystals growing as material crystallizes
  4. A hermit who lived in a tree

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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ItalianEdit

NounEdit

 
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dendrite m (plural dendriti)

  1. dendrite (all senses)

See alsoEdit