See also: ite, ITE, ʻite, -ité, and -īte

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From French -ite, from Old French, from Latin -ītēs, from Ancient Greek -ῑ́της (-ī́tēs).

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-ite

  1. (sometimes derogatory) Used to form nouns denoting followers or adherents of a specified person, idea, doctrine, movement, etc.
    Adamsite, Campbellite, Jacobite, laborite, Mansonite, Reaganite, Thatcherite
  2. Used to form nouns denoting descendants of a specified historical person, especially a biblical figure.
    Cainite, Ephraimite, Hamite, Japhetite, Lamanite
    • 1830, Joseph Smith, Book of Mormon, translation of original by Mormon, 4 Nephi 1:17:
      There were no robbers, nor murderers, neither were there Lamanites, nor any manner of -ites; but they were in one, the children of Christ, and heirs to the kingdom of God.
  3. (chiefly US, India) Used to form demonyms.
    Brooklynite, Delhiite, Jerusalemite, Keralite, New Jerseyite, Seattleite, Sydneyite, Wisconsinite, Wyomingite; also see ashramite, hostelite
  4. Used to form nouns denoting rocks or minerals.
    andalusite, anorthosite, anthracite, erythrite, forsterite, graphite, hawleyite, titanite
  5. Used to form nouns denoting fossil organisms.
    ammonite, belemnite
  6. (biology) Used to form nouns denoting segments or components of the body or an organ of the body.
    dendrite, somite
  7. Used to form nouns denoting the product of a specified process or a commercially manufactured product.
    Bakelite, cordite, dynamite, ebonite, metabolite, vulcanite
  8. (chemistry) Used to form names of certain chemical compounds, especially salts or esters of acids whose name ends in -ous.
    bromite, chlorite, iodite, phosphite, sulfite
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin past participles in -ītus, of verbs in -īre, -ĕre, -ēre, partly via Old French.

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-ite

  1. Forms adjectives.


See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Via Latin -ītēs from Ancient Greek -ίτης (-ítēs).

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-ite

  1. (medicine) -itis
  2. -ite (relating to following someone or something)
  3. (mineralogy) -ite

ItalianEdit

SuffixEdit

-ite f (plural -iti)

  1. used with a stem to form the feminine plural past participle of regular -ire verbs
  2. used with a stem to form the second-person plural present and imperative of regular -ire verbs
  3. (mineralogy) -ite
  4. (chemistry) -ite
  5. (pathology) -itis

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-ītē

  1. ablative singular of -ītēs
  2. vocative singular of -ītēs

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French -ite, -ete, from Latin -itās, -itātem; compare -te.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /-iˈteː/, /-iteː/

SuffixEdit

-ite

  1. Synonym of -te

Usage notesEdit

  • Syncope sometimes results in the replacement of -ite with -te. For instance, trinte is sometimes found for trinite (Trinity).
  • Conversely, learned influence may sometimes result in -te with -ite, especially when the word goes back to a Latin original with -itās. This is exemplified by the replacement of personalte (personality) with personalite in later Middle English (compare Latin persōnālitās).
  • As in modern English, -ite tends to attract stress to the antepenultimate syllable, while -te leaves stress where it was on the root.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: -ity
  • Scots: -ity, -eety

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

SuffixEdit

-ite f

  1. (pathology) -itis (forms the names of diseases characterised by inflammation)
  2. (geology) -ite (forms the names of rocks and minerals)
    Synonyms: (more common) -ita, (less common) -ito