See also: tree- and TREE

EnglishEdit

 
A tree structure

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English tre, tree, treo, treou, trew, trow, from Old English trēo, trēow (tree, wood, timber, beam, log, stake, stick, grove, cross, rood), from Proto-West Germanic *treu, from Proto-Germanic *trewą (tree, wood), from pre-Germanic *dréwom, thematic e-grade derivative of Proto-Indo-European *dóru (tree).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tree (plural trees or (obsolete) treen)

  1. A perennial woody plant, not exactly defined, but differentiated from a shrub by its larger size (typically over a few meters in height) or growth habit, usually having a single (or few) main axis or trunk unbranched for some distance above the ground and a head of branches and foliage.
    Hyperion is the tallest living tree in the world.
    Birds have a nest in a tree in the garden.
    • 1992 April 5, "The Full House", Jeeves and Wooster, Series 3, Episode 2:
      B. Wooster: Of all the places on this great planet of ours, West Neck, Long Island, has chosen to be the most unexciting. The last time anything remotely interesting happened here was in 1842, when a tree fell over. They still talk about it in the village.
    • 2019 October, Ian Walmsley, “Cleaning up”, in Modern Railways, page 42:
      When we see a train trapped behind (or embedded in) a fallen tree our first thought should be 'what was it doing there anyway?' [] Trees are also responsible for numerous minor delays in autumn [due to leaves falling on the track], which rolling stock engineers are supposed to cope with as usual.
  2. Any plant that is reminiscent of the above but not classified as a tree (in any botanical sense).
    the banana tree
  3. An object made from a tree trunk and having multiple hooks or storage platforms.
    He had the choice of buying a scratching post or a cat tree.
  4. A device used to hold or stretch a shoe open.
    He put a shoe tree in each of his shoes.
  5. The structural frame of a saddle.
  6. (graph theory) A connected graph with no cycles or, if the graph is finite, equivalently a connected graph with n vertices and n−1 edges.
  7. (computing theory) A recursive data structure in which each node has zero or more nodes as children.
  8. (graphical user interface) A display or listing of entries or elements such that there are primary and secondary entries shown, usually linked by drawn lines or by indenting to the right.
    We’ll show it as a tree list.
  9. Any structure or construct having branches representing divergence or possible choices.
  10. The structure or wooden frame used in the construction of a saddle used in horse riding.
  11. (in the plural, slang) Marijuana.
    • 2005, Eminem and Nate Dogg (lyrics), “Shake That”, in Curtain Call: The Hits:
      I like good pussy and I like good trees / Smoke so much weed you wouldn't believe
    • 2018, “Ace Feat. Smino & Saba”, in Room 25[1], performed by Noname:
      Whiskey with the team, got it bubblin' / I got trees in my luggage, I got tings out in London / Hope UK, what you say? Fuck is you sayin'?
  12. (obsolete) A cross or gallows.
    Tyburn tree
  13. (obsolete) Wood; timber.
  14. (chemistry) A mass of crystals, aggregated in arborescent forms, obtained by precipitation of a metal from solution.
  15. (cartomancy) The fifth Lenormand card.
  16. (uncountable, mathematics) Alternative letter-case form of TREE.

SynonymsEdit

The terms below need to be checked and allocated to the definitions (senses) of the headword above. Each term should appear in the sense for which it is appropriate. For synonyms and antonyms you may use the templates {{syn|en|...}} or {{ant|en|...}}.

HypernymsEdit

HyponymsEdit

Of the sense “a perennial plant”
  • See also Category:en:Trees
  • Computing, graph theory, mathematics
    Other hyponyms of tree

    MeronymsEdit

    Of the sense “a perennial plant”

    Derived termsEdit

    Terms derived from “tree”
    Attributive uses of the noun “tree”
    Idioms with the word “tree”

    ProverbsEdit

    DescendantsEdit

    • Jamaican Creole: chrii

    TranslationsEdit

    See alsoEdit

    ReferencesEdit

    VerbEdit

    tree (third-person singular simple present trees, present participle treeing, simple past and past participle treed)

    1. (transitive) To chase (an animal or person) up a tree.
      The dog treed the cat.
      • 1897, Henry Howard et al. (eds.), Encyclopaedia of Sport, London: Lawrence & Bullen, Volume I, p. 599,[2]
        When hunted it [the jaguar] takes refuge in trees, and this habit is well known to hunters, who pursue it with dogs and pot it when treed.
    2. (transitive) To place in a tree.
      Black bears can tree their cubs for protection, but grizzly bears cannot.
    3. (transitive) To place upon a tree; to fit with a tree; to stretch upon a tree.
      to tree a boot
    4. (intransitive) To take refuge in a tree.

    TranslationsEdit

    AnagramsEdit


    AfrikaansEdit

    EtymologyEdit

    From Dutch tree, syncopic form of trede, from Middle Dutch trede. Equivalent to a deverbal from treden.

    PronunciationEdit

    NounEdit

    tree (plural treë)

    1. step (single act of placing the foot when walking)
    2. yard (unit of length)

    DutchEdit

    Alternative formsEdit

    EtymologyEdit

    From syncope of trede, from Middle Dutch trede. Equivalent to a deverbal from treden.

    PronunciationEdit

    • IPA(key): /treː/, [treː], [treɪ̯]
    • (file)
    • Hyphenation: tree
    • Rhymes: -eː

    NounEdit

    tree m (plural treden or treeën or trees, diminutive treetje n)

    1. step (of a staircase), stair
    2. step (distance of one step when walking)
    3. (archaic, also tred) a unit of length of about 2 to 3 feet, roughly equivalent to a yard

    Derived termsEdit

    DescendantsEdit

    AnagramsEdit


    ManxEdit

    Alternative formsEdit

    EtymologyEdit

    From Old Irish trí, from Proto-Celtic *trīs, from Proto-Indo-European *tréyes.

    PronunciationEdit

    NumeralEdit

    tree

    1. three

    ReferencesEdit


    Middle EnglishEdit

    NounEdit

    tree

    1. Alternative form of tre

    North FrisianEdit

    EtymologyEdit

    From Old Frisian thrē.

    NumeralEdit

    tree

    1. (Heligoland) three