EnglishEdit

NounEdit

diarea (uncountable)

  1. Misspelling of diarrhea.
    • 1900, Supreme Court Appellate Division—Second Department, Mortimer S. Brown v. Augusta A. Brown[1]:
      This morning I noticed that what I raise is very much mixed with blood ever since I took them 2 Brandrettis pills it stopt the diarea entirely removed the swelling of my ankles & feet and broke loose some thing that made the blood flow hope it is all for the best
    • 1997 March 3, Michael Calleia, “diarea for month! What to do?”, in rec.pets.dogs.health, Usenet[2], retrieved 2022-04-30:
      I have a seven month old Pharaoh Hound that has had diarea for a month now. I have taken stole sample to vet #1 and they can't find anything. So, I tried vet #2, as per recommended by many people at my local dog run (personnally I sort of liked vet #1 better, vet #2 seemed a bit strange, and BTW I am thinking of trying vet #3 which is the vet my breeder uses (although it would be quite a trip to go for someone without a car (OK, enough about vets))).
    • 2003 June 2, justin, “diarea in my pants”, in alt.sex.fetish.diapers, Usenet[3], retrieved 2022-04-30:
      had diarea in my school clothes sat in class at 15. this has left me with a desire to meet other boys gay who messed there pants in school and to mail/meet a boy for pants messing
    • 2012 January 29, Bellende Belhamel, “verbal diarea”, in alt.freemasonry, Usenet[4], retrieved 2022-04-30:
      I think that some in this groups have a severe case of verbal diarea. I mean, they are message flooders, I have no idea where they get the time to bombard us with this endless flow of ........ (you name it.)

MalayEdit

 
Malay Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ms

EtymologyEdit

From English diarrhoea, from Middle French diarrie, from Latin diarrhoea, from Ancient Greek διάρροια (diárrhoia, a flowing-through; diarrhea).

NounEdit

diarea (plural diarea-diarea, informal 1st possessive diareaku, 2nd possessive diareamu, 3rd possessive diareanya)

  1. diarrhea.

Alternative formsEdit


RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Surmiran, Puter, Vallader) diarrea

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin diarrhoea, from Ancient Greek διάρροια (diárrhoia, through-flowing), from διά (diá, through) + ῥέω (rhéō, I flow).

NounEdit

diarea f

  1. (medicine, Sutsilvan) diarrhea

SynonymsEdit