Ancient Greek edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From *δισα (disa), from Proto-Indo-European *dwís (related to δίς (dís, twice) and δύο (dúo, two)).[1] Cognates include Latin dis- and Gothic 𐌳𐌹𐍃- (dis-).

The genitive is from the PIE ablative of comparison/extent. The accusative is from the pre-PIE directional and the PIE accusative of direct object.

Pronunciation edit

 

Preposition edit

δῐᾰ́ (diá) (governs the genitive and accusative)

  1. [+genitive]
    1. (of a place)
      1. in a line
      2. through
      3. in the midst of, between
      4. along
      5. at intervals of, at every
    2. (time)
      1. between
      2. after
      3. every (interval of time)
    3. (causality)
      1. through, by
      2. (attested from 1st century BCE) out of (materials from which something is made)
  2. [+accusative]
    1. (of a place, poetic) through, among
    2. (time) during
    3. (causality)
      1. thanks to, by aid of
      2. because of
      3. for the sake of

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Greek: για (gia), διά (diá)

Adverb edit

δῐᾰ́ (diá)

  1. throughout

See also edit

References edit

  1. ^ Pokorny, Julius (1959) Indogermanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch [Indo-European Etymological Dictionary] (in German), volume 1, Bern, München: Francke Verlag, page 228

Further reading edit

Greek edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Learnedly, from Ancient Greek δῐᾰ́. Doublet of για (gia).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ði̯a/, /ðʝa/ (the accent placed at the word which follows)
  • Hyphenation: δι‧ά
  • Hyphenation: διά

Preposition edit

διά (diá)

  1. by, for, through
  2. divided by
    Antonym: επί (epí)
    δέκα διά πέντε ίσον δύο
    ten divided by five equals two
  3. this is the name of the division symbol

Related terms edit

Further reading edit