Open main menu

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

1780-90; compare Scots dink (neatly dressed, trim) (of obscure origin); sense shift perhaps: trim > dainty > small > insignificant; +‎ -y.

AdjectiveEdit

dinky (comparative dinkier, superlative dinkiest)

  1. (informal, Britain) Tiny and cute; small and attractive.
    • 1915, Lucy Maud Montgomery, Anne of the Island, ch. 11
      How do you like my hat? That one you had on in church yesterday was real dinky.
    • 2010, Sharon Wallace, A House Full of Whispers[1], page 5:
      I played in the dirt with a small dinky car as the garage held no fascination for a little girl of five.
  2. (informal, US) Tiny and insignificant; small and undesirable.
    They stayed in a dinky hotel room, but they had a great trip.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

AcronymEdit

dinky

  1. Double income, no kids yet. Said of a relationship.

AnagramsEdit