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See also: Draper, drapër, dräper, and dråper

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Anglo-Norman draper, from Old French drapier, from drap + -ier

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

draper (plural drapers)

  1. One who sells cloths; a dealer in cloths

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French, from Old French draper (to drape", also, "to full cloth), from drap (cloth, drabcloth), from Late Latin drappus, drapus (drabcloth, kerchief), a word first recorded in the Capitularies of Charlemagne, probably from Old Low Frankish *drap, *drāp- (that which is fulled, drabcloth)[1] from Proto-Germanic *drap-, *drēp- (something beaten), from *drepaną (to beat, strike), from Proto-Indo-European *dhrebh- (to beat, crush, make or become thick)[2]. Cognate with English drub (to beat), Low German drapen, dräpen (to strike). More at drape.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

draper

  1. to drape

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ http://onlinedictionary.datasegment.com/word/drabcloth
  2. ^ Skeat, An Etymological Dictionary of the English Language, "Drab."

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit