Open main menu

Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek δραστικός (drastikós, active, efficient), from δρᾶσις (drâsis, strength, efficacy), itself from δράω (dráō, to do)

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈdɹɑːs.tɪk/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈdɹæs.tɪk/
  • Rhymes: -æstɪk
  • (file)
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

drastic (comparative more drastic, superlative most drastic)

  1. Having a strong or far-reaching effect; extreme, severe.
    • 2013 June 28, Joris Luyendijk, “Our banks are out of control”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 3, page 21:
      Seeing the British establishment struggle with the financial sector is like watching an alcoholic who still resists the idea that something drastic needs to happen for him to turn his life around.
    If our third attempt fails, we may need drastic ideas.
  2. Acting rapidly or violently.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

drastic (plural drastics)

  1. A powerful, fast-acting purgative medicine.

AnagramsEdit