See also: Drem

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English drēam, from Proto-Germanic *draumaz. Some senses influenced by Old Norse draumr, displacing sweven (from Old English swefn).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

drem (plural dremes)

  1. music (ether sung or instrumental)
  2. voice, conversing
  3. joy, mirthfulness
  4. dream (especially a prophetic one)
    • a. 1382, John Wycliffe, “Job 20:8”, in Wycliffe's Bible:
      As a dꝛeem fleynge awei he ſchal not be foundun he ſchal paſſe as a nyȝtis ſiȝt
      Like a dream going away, he won't be found; he'll disappear like a night's vision.
  5. (waking) vision, premonition

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: dream
  • Scots: dreme

ReferencesEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

drȇm m (Cyrillic spelling дре̑м)

  1. slumber, doze

DeclensionEdit