EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English *dosen, from Old Norse dúsa (to doze, rest, remain quiet), from Proto-Germanic *dusāną (to be dizzy), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰews- (to fly, whirl), from *dʰew- (to fly, shake, reek, steam, smolder). Cognate with Old Frisian dusia (to be dizzy), German Low German dösen (to doze), German dösen (to doze), Danish døse (to doze), dialectal Swedish dusa (to doze, slumber), Icelandic dúsa (to doze), Old English dysiġ (foolish, stupid), Scots dosnit (stunned, stupefied), Icelandic dúra (to nap, slumber), also compare Dutch doezelen (to doze). More at dizzy.

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

doze (third-person singular simple present dozes, present participle dozing, simple past and past participle dozed)

  1. (intransitive) To sleep lightly or briefly; to nap, snooze.
    I didn’t sleep very well, but I think I may have dozed a bit.
  2. (transitive) To make dull; to stupefy.
    • 1666, Samuel Pepys, diary dated 13 October, 1666
      I was an hour [] in casting up about twenty sums, being dozed with much work.
    • October 29, 1693, Robert South, a sermon preached at Christ-church in Oxford before the university
      They left for a long time (as it were) dozed and benumbed.
  3. (intransitive, slang) To bulldoze.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

doze (plural dozes)

  1. A light, short sleep or nap.
    I felt much better after a short doze.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

DeterminerEdit

doze

  1. Pronunciation spelling of those.
    • 1987, Don Rosa, Recalled Wreck
      Donald Duck: I'll give you $20 for those old license plates on your fence posts!
      Other man: Hah? No chance! I bought dis house 'cause it has dis address! It's me lucky number! [] It was me prison number at Leavenworst and de winning number in de weekly parole lottery! I wudn't never sell doze plates!

AragoneseEdit

Aragonese cardinal numbers
 <  11 12 13  > 
    Cardinal : doze

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin duodecim.

NumeralEdit

doze

  1. twelve

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *dōdeci, from Latin duodecim.

PronunciationEdit

NumeralEdit

cardinal number
12 Previous: onze
Next: treze

doze

  1. twelve

Derived termsEdit

  • dozaine (dozen)
    • French: douzaine (see there for further descendants)
    • Middle Dutch: dosine
      • Dutch: dozijn (see there for further descendants)
    • Middle English: dozen, dozein, dozeyne
      • English: dozen (see there for further descendants)
    • Middle High German: totzan, totzen

DescendantsEdit


PortugueseEdit

Portuguese cardinal numbers
 <  11 12 13  > 
    Cardinal : doze
    Ordinal : décimo segundo
Portuguese Wikipedia article on doze

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Portuguese doze, from Vulgar Latin *dōdeci, from Latin duodecim.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

doze m or f

  1. twelve

NounEdit

doze m (plural dozes)

  1. twelve (the numerical value 12 or something with the value of 12)

NounEdit

doze f (plural dozes)

  1. (Brazil, colloquial) shotgun (gun which fires loads consisting of small metal balls)

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

doze f (plural dozes)

  1. Obsolete spelling of dose

WalloonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French doze, from Vulgar Latin *dōdeci, from Latin duodecim.

NumeralEdit

doze

  1. twelve