EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From em- +‎ bay (bathe).

VerbEdit

embay (third-person singular simple present embays, present participle embaying, simple past and past participle embayed)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To bathe; to steep.

Etymology 2Edit

From em- +‎ bay.

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

embay (third-person singular simple present embays, present participle embaying, simple past and past participle embayed)

  1. (transitive) To shut in, enclose, shelter or trap, such as ships in a bay.
    • 1888, Thomas Hardy, “An Imaginative Woman”, in Wessex Tales:
      Herself the only daughter of a struggling man of letters, she had during the last year or two taken to writing poems, in an endeavour to find a congenial channel in which to let flow her painfully embayed emotions, whose former limpidity and sparkle seemed departing in the stagnation caused by the routine of a practical household and the gloom of bearing children to a commonplace father.

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AnagramsEdit