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EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • inclose (was as common as or more common than enclose until the early 1800s, is now uncommon)

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English enclosen, inclosen, from Middle English enclos, from Old French enclose, feminine plural past participle of enclore, from Vulgar Latin *inclaudo, *inclaudere, from Latin includo (Doublet of include). Equivalent to en- +‎ close.

PronunciationEdit

  • (Canada) IPA(key): /ənˈkloʊz/
  • (file)
  • (UK) IPA(key): /ɪnˈkləʊz/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ɪnˈkloʊz/
  • Rhymes: -əʊz

VerbEdit

enclose (third-person singular simple present encloses, present participle enclosing, simple past and past participle enclosed)

  1. (transitive) To surround with a wall, fence, etc.
    to enclose lands
  2. (transitive) To insert into a container, usually an envelope or package.
    Please enclose a stamped self-addressed envelope if you require a reply.
  3. (intransitive) To hold or contain. (Can we add an example for this sense?)

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