See also: Bay, bây, bẫy, bảy, baþ, and бау

English edit

 
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Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English baye, baie, from Old English beġ (berry), as in beġbēam (berry-tree), conflated with Old French baie, from Latin bāca (berry).

Noun edit

bay (plural bays)

  1. (obsolete) A berry.
  2. Laurus nobilis, a tree or shrub of the family Lauraceae, having dark green leaves and berries.
  3. Bay leaf, the leaf of this or certain other species of tree or shrub, used as a herb.
  4. (in the plural, now rare) The leaves of this shrub, woven into a garland used to reward a champion or victor; hence, fame, victory.
  5. (US, dialect) A tract covered with bay trees.
  6. A kind of mahogany obtained from Campeche in Mexico.
Synonyms edit
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Etymology 2 edit

From French baie, from Late Latin baia, probably ultimately from Iberian or Basque badia. Displaced native Old English byht.

Noun edit

bay (plural bays)

  1. (geography) A body of water (especially the sea) more-or-less three-quarters surrounded by land.
    • 1913, Joseph C[rosby] Lincoln, chapter I, in Mr. Pratt’s Patients, New York, N.Y., London: D[aniel] Appleton and Company, →OCLC:
      'Twas early June, the new grass was flourishing everywheres, the posies in the yard—peonies and such—in full bloom, the sun was shining, and the water of the bay was blue, with light green streaks where the shoal showed.
  2. A bank or dam to keep back water.
Synonyms edit
  • (body of water): gulf
Derived terms edit
in toponyms of Newfoundland
in toponyms of Nova Scotia
Translations edit

Etymology 3 edit

From Middle English, from Old French baee, beee, from the verb beer (gape open), from Early Medieval Latin batāre. Compare Modern French baie. More at bevel, badinage.

Noun edit

bay (plural bays)

  1. An opening in a wall, especially between two columns.
  2. An internal recess; a compartment or area surrounded on three sides.
    • 2012, BioWare, Mass Effect 3 (Science Fiction), Redwood City: Electronic Arts, →OCLC, PC, scene: Normandy SR-2:
      Wrex: And Shepard--I like what you've done with the Normandy. Got tired of always hanging around the cargo bay before.
    • 2013 June 1, “Ideas coming down the track”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8838, page 13 (Technology Quarterly):
      A “moving platform” scheme [] is more technologically ambitious than maglev trains even though it relies on conventional rails. Local trains would use side-by-side rails to roll alongside intercity trains and allow passengers to switch trains by stepping through docking bays.
  3. The distance between two supports in a vault or building with a pitched roof.
  4. (nautical) Each of the spaces, port and starboard, between decks, forward of the bitts, in sailing warships.
  5. (rail transport) A bay platform.
    • 1946 May and June, G. A. Sekon, “L.B.S.C.R. West Coast Section—3”, in Railway Magazine, page 149:
      There is a short bay at the west end of each platform, but neither is used for passenger trains.
  6. A bay window.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Etymology 4 edit

From Old French bay, combined with aphetized form of abay; verbal form of baier, abaier.

Noun edit

bay (plural bays)

  1. The excited howling of dogs when hunting or being attacked.
    • c. 1588–1593, William Shakespeare, Titus Andronicus, act 2, scene 2, lines 1–6:
      The hunt is up, the morn is bright and grey, / The fields are fragrant, and the woods are green. / Uncouple here, and let us make a bay / And wake the Emperor and his lovely bride, / And rouse the Prince, and ring a hunter's peal, / That all the court may echo with the noise.
  2. (by extension) The climactic confrontation between hunting-dogs and their prey.
  3. (figuratively) A state of being obliged to face an antagonist or a difficulty, when escape has become impossible.
    • 1697, Virgil, “(please specify the book number)”, in John Dryden, transl., The Works of Virgil: Containing His Pastorals, Georgics, and Æneis. [], London: [] Jacob Tonson, [], →OCLC:
      Embolden'd by despair, he stood at bay.
    • 1832, [Isaac Taylor], Saturday Evening. [], London: Holdsworth and Ball, →OCLC:
      The most terrible evils are just kept at bay by incessant efforts.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Verb edit

bay (third-person singular simple present bays, present participle baying, simple past and past participle bayed)

  1. (intransitive) To howl.
  2. (transitive) To bark at; hence, to follow with barking; to bring or drive to bay.
    to bay the bear
    • a. 1611, William Shakespeare, Cymbeline, act 5, scene 5, lines 222–223:
      Spit, and throw stones, cast mire upon me, set / The dogs o'th' street to bay me
  3. (transitive) To pursue noisily, like a pack of hounds.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Etymology 5 edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
 

From Middle English bay, bai, from Old French bai, from Latin badius (reddish brown, chestnut).

Adjective edit

bay (comparative bayer or more bay, superlative bayest or most bay)

  1. (especially of horses) Of a reddish-brown colour.
    • 2003 January 8, Stuart Lavietes, “F. William Free, 74, Ad Man Behind 'Fly Me'”, in The New York Times[1], →ISSN:
      Mr. Free also owned restaurants and bred horses. His bay gelding, Packett's Landing, won almost $800,000 in his five-year career in the late 1980's and early 1990's.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Noun edit

bay (countable and uncountable, plural bays)

  1.  A brown colour/color of the coat of some horses.
    bay:  
  2. A horse of this color.
    • 1877, George Nevile, Horses and Riding, page 105:
      [] browns are the soberest, bays are the worst tempered, and chestnuts are the most foolish.
Quotations edit
Translations edit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See also edit

References edit


Anagrams edit

Anguthimri edit

Noun edit

bay

  1. (Mpakwithi) barracouta

References edit

  • Terry Crowley, The Mpakwithi dialect of Anguthimri (1981), page 185

Cebuano edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈbaj/, [ˈbaɪ̯]

Etymology 1 edit

Aphetic form of abay.

Noun edit

bay (Badlit spelling ᜊᜌ᜔)

  1. Term of address to a male friend

Etymology 2 edit

Noun edit

bay (Badlit spelling ᜊᜌ᜔)

  1. (Urban Cebu, Bohol, Leyte) Contraction of balay.

Cornish edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bay m (plural bayow)

  1. kiss

Synonyms edit

Related terms edit

Mutation edit

Crimean Tatar edit

Adjective edit

bay

  1. rich

Declension edit

Guianese Creole edit

Etymology edit

From French bailler.

Verb edit

bay

  1. to give

Haitian Creole edit

Etymology edit

From Saint Dominican Creole French baye, from French bailler.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

bay

  1. to give
    Synonyms: ba, ban

Hone edit

Noun edit

bay

  1. dog

Further reading edit

  • Anne Storch, Hone, in Coding Participant Marking: Construction Types in Twelve African Languages, edited by Gerrit Jan Dimmendaal

Nyunga edit

This entry has fewer than three known examples of actual usage, the minimum considered necessary for clear attestation, and may not be reliable. Nyunga is subject to a special exemption for languages with limited documentation. If you speak it, please consider editing this entry or adding citations. See also Help and the Community Portal.

Noun edit

bay

  1. buttock

References edit

  • 1992, Rose Whitehurst, Noongar Dictionary, Noongar Language and Culture Centre (Bunbury, Western Australia)

San Juan Guelavía Zapotec edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Spanish paño.

Noun edit

bay

  1. rebozo

References edit

  • López Antonio, Joaquín; Jones, Ted; Jones, Kris (2012) Vocabulario breve del Zapoteco de San Juan Guelavía[2] (in Spanish), second electronic edition, Tlalpan, D.F.: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, A.C., pages 13, 28

Spanish edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English bye.

Interjection edit

bay

  1. bye; so long

Tandaganon edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Bisayan *balay, from Proto-Central Philippine *balay, from Proto-Philippine *balay, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *balay, from Proto-Austronesian *balay. Cognate of Cebuano balay and Tausug bāy.

Noun edit

bay

  1. house; home

Alternative forms edit

Tatar edit

Adjective edit

bay

  1. rich, noble

Tausug edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *balay.

Noun edit

bāy

  1. house

Turkish edit

Etymology edit

From Ottoman Turkishبای(bay, rich), from Proto-Turkic *bāy (rich, noble; many, numerous).

The meaning “sir, gentleman” was coined during the language reforms to replace bey.[1]

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bay (definite accusative bayı, plural baylar)

  1. (countable) gentleman
  2. (title used for a man) Mr.

Usage notes edit

Used as a title, the word is usually capitalized and followed by a person's name, often his surname or full name (as in “Bay Ahmet Şık”). This is unlike the more traditional title bey, which is used after a person's name, most commonly just his given name (as in “Ahmet Bey”).

Declension edit

Inflection
Nominative bay
Definite accusative bayı
Singular Plural
Nominative bay baylar
Definite accusative bayı bayları
Dative baya baylara
Locative bayda baylarda
Ablative baydan baylardan
Genitive bayın bayların
Possessive forms
Nominative
Singular Plural
1st singular bayım baylarım
2nd singular bayın bayların
3rd singular bayı bayları
1st plural bayımız baylarımız
2nd plural bayınız baylarınız
3rd plural bayları bayları
Definite accusative
Singular Plural
1st singular bayımı baylarımı
2nd singular bayını baylarını
3rd singular bayını baylarını
1st plural bayımızı baylarımızı
2nd plural bayınızı baylarınızı
3rd plural baylarını baylarını
Dative
Singular Plural
1st singular bayıma baylarıma
2nd singular bayına baylarına
3rd singular bayına baylarına
1st plural bayımıza baylarımıza
2nd plural bayınıza baylarınıza
3rd plural baylarına baylarına
Locative
Singular Plural
1st singular bayımda baylarımda
2nd singular bayında baylarında
3rd singular bayında baylarında
1st plural bayımızda baylarımızda
2nd plural bayınızda baylarınızda
3rd plural baylarında baylarında
Ablative
Singular Plural
1st singular bayımdan baylarımdan
2nd singular bayından baylarından
3rd singular bayından baylarından
1st plural bayımızdan baylarımızdan
2nd plural bayınızdan baylarınızdan
3rd plural baylarından baylarından
Genitive
Singular Plural
1st singular bayımın baylarımın
2nd singular bayının baylarının
3rd singular bayının baylarının
1st plural bayımızın baylarımızın
2nd plural bayınızın baylarınızın
3rd plural baylarının baylarının

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Adjective edit

bay

  1. (dialectal, otherwise dated) rich, wealthy

Declension edit

Inflection
Nominative bay
Definite accusative bayı
Singular Plural
Nominative bay baylar
Definite accusative bayı bayları
Dative baya baylara
Locative bayda baylarda
Ablative baydan baylardan
Genitive bayın bayların
Predicative forms
Singular Plural
1st singular bayım baylarım
2nd singular baysın baylarsın
3rd singular bay
baydır
baylar
baylardır
1st plural bayız baylarız
2nd plural baysınız baylarsınız
3rd plural baylar baylardır

Synonyms edit

Antonyms edit

Derived terms edit

References edit

  1. ^ Nişanyan, Sevan (2002–), “bay”, in Nişanyan Sözlük

Vietnamese edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Proto-Vietic *pər, from Proto-Mon-Khmer *par; cognates include Muong păl, Bahnar păr, Pacoh pár and Mon ပဝ် ().

Verb edit

bay (, 𠖤, 𩙻)

  1. to fly (travel through the air)
  2. to flutter (flap or wave quickly but irregularly)
  3. to fly (travel very fast)
  4. to fade away
Derived terms edit
Derived terms

Adverb edit

bay

  1. with ease; in a fast-paced manner
    cãi bayto bluntly deny

Etymology 2 edit

Noun edit

(classifier cái) bay (𨭍)

  1. trowel

Etymology 3 edit

See bây.

Alternative forms edit

Pronoun edit

bay

  1. (informal) you (second-person plural)
Related terms edit

References edit

Zoogocho Zapotec edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Spanish paño (cloth), from Latin pannus.

Noun edit

bay

  1. handkerchief
  2. scarf

Derived terms edit

References edit

  • Long C., Rebecca; Cruz M., Sofronio (2000) Diccionario zapoteco de San Bartolomé Zoogocho, Oaxaca (Serie de vocabularios y diccionarios indígenas “Mariano Silva y Aceves”; 38)‎[3] (in Spanish), second electronic edition, Coyoacán, D.F.: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, A.C., page 5