equivoque

See also: equivoqué and équivoque

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin aequivocus (ambiguous, equivocal), from Latin aequus (equal) + vocō (call).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

equivoque (comparative more equivoque, superlative most equivoque)

  1. (obsolete) Equivocal.

NounEdit

equivoque (plural equivoques)

  1. (obsolete) A homonym.
  2. A play on words, a pun.
    • 1751, Tobias Smollett, The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle, vol. II, ch. 53:
      [H]e sported in many other æquivoques of the same nature; and at dinner told the physician, that he was like the root of the tongue, as being cursedly down in the mouth.
  3. Ambiguity or double meaning.
    • 1942, Rebecca West, Black Lamb and Grey Falcon, Canongate 2006, p. 648:
      [T]he black wisps of women bargaining behind those veils might turn out to be the ballet and coalesce in some dance gaily admitting their equivoque of concealing and proclaiming their sex.

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

equivoque

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of equivocar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of equivocar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of equivocar.