LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From ērudīre (to remove from ignorance, to educate) +‎ -tiō (forming nouns from verbs)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ērudītiō f (genitive ērudītiōnis); third declension

  1. That which removes one from ignorance, whether
    1. instruction, education
    2. erudition, learning, knowledge

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative ērudītiō ērudītiōnēs
Genitive ērudītiōnis ērudītiōnum
Dative ērudītiōnī ērudītiōnibus
Accusative ērudītiōnem ērudītiōnēs
Ablative ērudītiōne ērudītiōnibus
Vocative ērudītiō ērudītiōnēs

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • eruditio in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • eruditio in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • eruditio in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to be well-informed, erudite: multarum rerum cognitione imbutum esse (opp. litterarum or eruditionis expertem esse or [rerum] rudem esse)