English

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Two German- or Swiss-style estocs.

Etymology

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French estoc, see there for more. Compare Middle English touk (a sword) (whence obsolete English tuck (rapier, sword)), Middle English stok(e) (blow with a sword) (both probably from Old French estoc).

Noun

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estoc (plural estocs)

  1. A type of sword used from the 14th to the 17th century, characterized by a long, straight, edgeless, sharply pointed blade designed for penetrating mail or plate.

Anagrams

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Catalan

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Etymology

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Borrowed from French estoc.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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estoc m (plural estocs)

  1. rapier

Derived terms

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Further reading

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French

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ɛs.tɔk/
  • Audio:(file)

Etymology 1

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Inherited from Middle French and Old French estoc (trunk), from Frankish *stokk. Probably a doublet of étau (vise).

Noun

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estoc m (plural estocs)

  1. trunk or stump of a tree
    Synonyms: tronc; souche
  2. stock, heritage
    Synonyms: lignage, lignée, parenté

Etymology 2

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Inherited from Middle French and Old French estoc (sword, its point). Probably deverbal from Old French estoquer, estochier (to thrust, stab), from Frankish *stokōn. See English stoke for more. Influence by etymology 1 in the sense of “stick, club” is possible.

Noun

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estoc m (plural estocs)

  1. (historical) a kind of sword, rapier
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Further reading

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Anagrams

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Romanian

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Etymology

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Borrowed from French estoc.

Noun

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estoc n (uncountable)

  1. (type of) sword, rapier

Declension

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References

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  • estoc in Academia Română, Micul dicționar academic, ediția a II-a, Bucharest: Univers Enciclopedic, 2010. →ISBN