Open main menu
See also: Sword and s-word

Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English sword, swerd, from Old English sweord (sword), from Proto-Germanic *swerdą (sword), possibly from Proto-Indo-European *seh₂w- (sharp). Cognate with Scots swerd, sword (sword), North Frisian swird (sword), West Frisian swurd (sword), Dutch zwaard (sword), Low German Sweerd, Schwert (sword), German Schwert (sword), Danish sværd, Norwegian sverd, Swedish svärd (sword), Icelandic sverð (sword), Old East Slavic свьрдьлъ (svĭrdĭlŭ, drill).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sword (plural swords)

 
a sword
  1. (weaponry) A long-bladed weapon with a hilt, and usually a pommel and cross-guard, which is designed to stab, slash, and/or hack.
  2. (tarot) A suit in the minor arcana in tarot.
  3. (tarot) A card of this suit.
  4. (weaving) One of the end bars by which the lay of a hand loom is suspended.
  5. (heraldry) The weapon, often used as a heraldic charge.

Coordinate termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English sword, a Mercian form of sweord (which some forms are directly from); from Proto-Germanic *swerdą.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sword (plural swordes or sworden)

  1. sword, sabre
  2. (figuratively) Military might or power.

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

from Proto-Germanic *swerdą,

NounEdit

sword n (nominative plural sword)

  1. (Mercian) a sword