See also: Stock, Stöck, -stock, and stock-

English edit

 
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Wikipedia

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old English stocc, from Proto-West Germanic *stokk, from Proto-Germanic *stukkaz (tree-trunk), with modern senses mostly referring either to the trunk from which the tree grows (figuratively, its origin and/or support/foundation), or to a piece of wood, stick, or rod. The senses of "supply" and "raw material" arose from a probable conflation with steck (an item of goods, merchandise) or the use of split tally sticks consisting of foil or counterfoil and stock to capture paid taxes, debts or exchanges. Doublet of chock.

Noun edit

stock (countable and uncountable, plural stocks or (obsolete) stocken)

  1. A store or supply.
    1. (operations) A store of goods ready for sale; inventory.
      We have a stock of televisions on hand.
    2. A supply of anything ready for use.
      Lay in a stock of wood for the winter season.
    3. Railroad rolling stock.
    4. (card games, in a card game) A stack of undealt cards made available to the players.
    5. Farm or ranch animals; livestock.
    6. The population of a given type of animal (especially fish) available to be captured from the wild for economic use.
  2. (finance) The capital raised by a company through the issue of shares. The total of shares held by an individual shareholder.
    1. The price or value of the stock of a company on the stock market.
      When the bad news came out, the company's stock dropped precipitously.
    2. (especially US) A share in a company.
    3. (figurative) The measure of how highly a person or institution is valued.
      Synonym: reputation
      After that last screw-up of mine, my stock is pretty low around here.
      • 2022 January 17, Jonathan Martin, Maggie Haberman, “Who Is King of Florida? Tensions Rise Between Trump and a Former Acolyte.”, in The New York Times[1], →ISSN:
        With his stock rising fast in the party, the governor has conspicuously refrained from saying he would stand aside if Mr. Trump runs for the Republican nomination for president in 2024.
    4. Any of several types of security that are similar to a stock, or marketed like one.
  3. The raw material from which things are made; feedstock.
    1. (cooking, uncountable, countable) Broth made from meat (originally bones) or vegetables, used as a basis for stew or soup.
    2. The type of paper used in printing.
      The books were printed on a heavier stock this year.
    3. Ellipsis of film stock.
    4. Plain soap before it is coloured and perfumed.
  4. Stock theater, summer stock theater.
  5. The trunk and woody main stems of a tree. The base from which something grows or branches.
    1. (horticulture) The plant upon which the scion is grafted.
      • 1631, Francis [Bacon], “(please specify |century=I to X)”, in Sylua Syluarum: Or A Naturall Historie. In Ten Centuries. [], 3rd edition, London: [] William Rawley; [p]rinted by J[ohn] H[aviland] for William Lee [], →OCLC:
        The cion overruleth the stock quite.
    2. (by extension) Lineage, family, ancestry.
      • c. 1587–1588, [Christopher Marlowe], Tamburlaine the Great. [] The First Part [], 2nd edition, part 1, London: [] [R. Robinson for] Richard Iones, [], published 1592, →OCLC; reprinted as Tamburlaine the Great (A Scolar Press Facsimile), Menston, Yorkshire, London: Scolar Press, 1973, →ISBN, Act I, scene i:
        UUhat, ſhall I call thee brother? No, a foe,
        Monſter of Nature, ſhame vnto thy ſtocke,
        That darſt preſume thy Soueraigne for to mocke.
      • 2003 November 14, Jacques Peretti, “You are a bad man trying to do bad things to Vincent”, in The Guardian[2]:
        His hatred is not based upon whom these people are (like many rightwing Republicans, Gallo comes from immigrant stock), but how easily these people have come by success in America.
      • 2010, Lewis Richard Farnell, The Cults of the Greek States, page 108:
        We may also conclude that as it was the Ionic γένη of the Attic tetrapolis who in the main achieved the Ionization of Athens, so it was a branch of this same stock that settled at Delos []
      1. (linguistics) A larger grouping of language families: a superfamily or macrofamily.
  6. Any of the several species of cruciferous flowers in the genus Matthiola.
  7. A handle or stem to which the working part of an implement or weapon is attached.
    1. (firearms) The part of a rifle or shotgun that rests against the shooter's shoulder.
      • 2013, Tom Turpin, Modern Custom Guns: Walnut, Steel, and Uncommon Artistry, 2nd edition, Iola, Wis.: Gun Digest Books, →ISBN, page 47:
        The most underrated component in building a custom gun is the metalsmithing. Stock work immediately attracts attention. Fancy checkering patterns, meticulously executed, are sure to elicit oohs and ahhs.
    2. The handle of a whip, fishing rod, etc.
  8. Part of a machine that supports items or holds them in place.
    1. The headstock of a lathe, drill, etc.
    2. The tailstock of a lathe.
  9. A bar, stick or rod.
    1. A ski pole.
    2. (nautical) A bar going through an anchor, perpendicular to the flukes.
      • 1904–1906, Joseph Conrad, chapter IV, in The Mirror of the Sea, 1st American edition, New York, N.Y., London: Harper & Brothers, published October 1906, →OCLC:
        The honest, rough piece of iron, so simple in appearance, has more parts than the human body has limbs: the ring, the stock, the crown, the flukes, the palms, the shank. All this, according to the journalist, is “cast” when a ship arriving at an anchorage is brought up.
    3. (nautical) The axle attached to the rudder, which transfers the movement of the helm to the rudder.
    4. (geology) A pipe (vertical cylinder of ore)
  10. A type of (now formal or official) neckwear.
    1. A necktie or cravat, particularly a wide necktie popular in the eighteenth century, often seen today as a part of formal wear for horse riding competitions.
      • 1915, W. Somerset Maugham, “chapter 116”, in Of Human Bondage:
        He wore a brown tweed suit and a white stock. His clothes hung loosely about him as though they had been made for a much larger man. He looked like a respectable farmer of the middle of the nineteenth century.
      • 1978, Lawrence Durrell, Livia, Faber & Faber 1992 (Avignon Quintet), page 417:
        His grey waistcoat sported pearl buttons, and he wore a stock which set off to admiration a lean and aquiline face which was almost as grey as the rest of him.
    2. A piece of black cloth worn under a clerical collar.
  11. A bed for infants; a crib, cot, or cradle
  12. (folklore) A piece of wood magically made to be just like a real baby and substituted for it by magical beings.
  13. (obsolete) A cover for the legs; a stocking.
  14. A block of wood; something fixed and solid; a pillar; a firm support; a post.
  15. (by extension, obsolete) A person who is as dull and lifeless as a stock or post; one who has little sense.
  16. (UK, historical) The longest part of a split tally stick formerly struck in the exchequer, which was delivered to the person who had lent the king money on account, as the evidence of indebtedness.
  17. (shipbuilding, in the plural) The frame or timbers on which a ship rests during construction.
  18. (UK, in the plural) Red and grey bricks, used for the exterior of walls and the front of buildings.
  19. (biology) In tectology, an aggregate or colony of individuals, such as trees, chains of salpae, etc.
  20. The beater of a fulling mill.
    • 1842, Jam Bischoff, A Comprehensive History of the Woollen and Worsted Manufactures:
      [] a somewhat rude machine called the stocks, and consisting of a pair of wooden mallets, worked alternately by a cog wheel.
Synonyms edit
Hyponyms edit
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit
  • Dutch: stock
  • French: stock
  • Italian: stock
  • Portuguese: estoque
  • Spanish: stock
Translations edit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb edit

stock (third-person singular simple present stocks, present participle stocking, simple past and past participle stocked)

  1. To have on hand for sale.
    The store stocks all kinds of dried vegetables.
    • 2005, William Froug, How I Escaped from Gilligan's Island:
      ...he would not stock any product on his shelves from any company that hired a communist or, as it was called at the time, a comsymp.
  2. To provide with material requisites; to store; to fill; to supply.
    to stock a warehouse with goods
    to stock a farm, i.e. to supply it with cattle and tools
    to stock land, i.e. to occupy it with a permanent growth, especially of grass
    • 1951 February, K. Westcott Jones, “Some Australian Railway Byways”, in Railway Magazine, page 118:
      A rather interesting and notable convenience, however, is that of ice water bags, which are hung on to the outside of the coaches at certain stops. These can be reached by leaning out of the window rather perilously, to unhook them, and paper cups are stocked in the compartments.
  3. To allow (cows) to retain milk for twenty-four hours or more prior to sale.
  4. To put in the stocks as punishment.
    • c. 1603–1606, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of King Lear”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, →OCLC, (please specify the act number in uppercase Roman numerals, and the scene number in lowercase Roman numerals):
      Poor Tom, that [] eats cow-dung for sallets; swallows the old rat, and the ditch-dog; drinks the green mantle of the standing pool; who is whipp'd from tything to tything, and stock'd, punish'd, and imprison'd
  5. (nautical) To fit (an anchor) with a stock, or to fasten the stock firmly in place.
  6. (card games, dated) To arrange cards in a certain manner for cheating purposes; to stack the deck.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Adjective edit

stock (not comparable)

  1. Of a type normally available for purchase/in stock.
    stock items
    stock sizes
  2. (motor racing, of a race car) Having the same configuration as cars sold to the non-racing public, or having been modified from such a car.
  3. Straightforward, ordinary, just another, very basic.
    He gave me a stock answer.
Translations edit

See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Italian stoccata.

Noun edit

stock (plural stocks)

  1. A thrust with a rapier; a stoccado.

Anagrams edit

Dutch edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English stock.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

stock m (plural stocks, diminutive stockje n)

  1. stock, goods in supply
  2. basic capital
  3. shares (equity)

Derived terms edit

References edit

  • M. J. Koenen & J. Endepols, Verklarend Handwoordenboek der Nederlandse Taal (tevens Vreemde-woordentolk), Groningen, Wolters-Noordhoff, 1969 (26th edition) [Dutch dictionary in Dutch]

French edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English stock.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

stock m (plural stocks)

  1. stock, goods in supply
  2. stock, a reserve (generally)
  3. Supply of (wild) fish available for commerce, stock

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

Further reading edit

Italian edit

Etymology edit

Unadapted borrowing from English stock.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

stock

  1. stock, goods in supply, inventory

References edit

  1. ^ stock in Luciano Canepari, Dizionario di Pronuncia Italiana (DiPI)

Spanish edit

 
Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

Etymology edit

Unadapted borrowing from English stock.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

stock m (plural stocks)

  1. stock, inventory

Usage notes edit

According to Royal Spanish Academy (RAE) prescriptions, unadapted foreign words should be written in italics in a text printed in roman type, and vice versa, and in quotation marks in a manuscript text or when italics are not available. In practice, this RAE prescription is not always followed.

Further reading edit

Swedish edit

Etymology edit

From Old Swedish stokker, from Old Norse stokkr, from Proto-Germanic *stukkaz (tree-trunk).

Noun edit

 
Several "stockar" of snus

stock c

  1. a log (trunk of a dead tree)
  2. a stock (of a gun)
  3. (in some compounds) a thick (wooden) object
  4. a pack of snus, usually ten, wrapped in plastic film or packed in a light cardboard box
    Synonyms: rulle, limpa

Declension edit

Declension of stock 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative stock stocken stockar stockarna
Genitive stocks stockens stockars stockarnas

Related terms edit

See also edit

Further reading edit