stoke

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English stoken, from Middle Dutch stoken ‎(to poke, thrust) or Middle Low German stoken ‎(to poke, thrust), ultimately from Proto-Germanic *stukōną ‎(to be stiff, push), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)teug- ‎(to push, beat). Cognate with Middle High German stoken ‎(to pierce, jab), Norwegian Nynorsk stauka ‎(to push, thrust). Alternative etymology derives the Middle English word from Old French estoquer, estochier ‎(to thrust, strike), from the same Germanic source. More at stock.

VerbEdit

stoke ‎(third-person singular simple present stokes, present participle stoking, simple past and past participle stoked)

  1. (transitive) To poke, pierce, thrust.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From a back-formation of stoker, apparently from Dutch stoker, from Dutch stoken ‎(to kindle a fire, incite, instigate), from Middle Dutch stoken ‎(to poke, thrust), from stock ‎(stick, stock), see: tandenstoker. Ultimately the same word as above.

VerbEdit

stoke ‎(third-person singular simple present stokes, present participle stoking, simple past and past participle stoked)

  1. (transitive) To feed, stir up, especially, a fire or furnace.
  2. (intransitive) To attend to or supply a furnace with fuel; to act as a stoker or fireman.
  3. To stick; to thrust; to stab.
    • Chaucer
      Nor short sword for to stoke, with point biting.
TranslationsEdit
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Misconstruction of stokes

NounEdit

stoke

  1. (physics) Misspelling of stokes. (A unit of kinematic viscosity equal to that of a fluid with a viscosity of one poise and a density of one gram per millilitre)

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

stoke

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of stoken
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