EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English eterne, from Old French eterne, from Latin aeternus.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

eterne (comparative more eterne, superlative most eterne)

  1. (obsolete) Eternal. [14th-19th c.]
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.6:
      The substance is eterne, and bideth so; / Ne when the life decayes and forme does fade, / Doth it consume and into nothing goe [...].
    • 1602, William Shakespeare, Hamlet, First Folio 1621, II.2:
      And neuer did the Cyclops hammers fall / On Mars his Armours, forg'd for proofe Eterne, / With lesse remorse then Pyrrhus bleeding sword / Now falles on Priam.
    • 1856, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, “Third Book”, in Aurora Leigh, London: Chapman and Hall, [], published 1857, OCLC 1000396166:
      Eterne, intense, profuse,—still throwing up
      The golden spray of multitudinous worlds
      In measure to the proclive weight and rush
      Of His inner nature []

AnagramsEdit


EsperantoEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

eterne

  1. forever, eternally

Related termsEdit


ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

eterne

  1. feminine plural of eterno

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old French eterne, from Latin aeternus, contraction of aeviternus.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɛˈtɛːrn(ə)/, /ɛˈtɛrn(ə)/

AdjectiveEdit

eterne

  1. Eternal, permanent; having existed (and existing) forever.
  2. Endless, unending; lasting forever.
  3. (rare) Long-lasting; non-ephemeral.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: eterne, etern (obsolete)
  • Scots: eterne, etern (obsolete)

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

NounEdit

eterne m

  1. definite plural of eter