See also: eternò and Eterno

EsperantoEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

eterno (accusative singular eternon, plural eternoj, accusative plural eternojn)

  1. eternity
    Synonym: eterneco

Related termsEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin aeternus.

AdjectiveEdit

eterno m (feminine singular eterna, masculine plural eternos, feminine plural eternas)

  1. eternal

ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /eˈtɛr.no/, [eˈt̪ɛr̺n̺o]
  • Rhymes: -ɛrno
  • Hyphenation: e‧tèr‧no

Etymology 1Edit

First attested 14th century. From Latin aeternus, from an earlier form aeviternus, derived from aevum (time; age).[1]

Alternative formsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

eterno (feminine singular eterna, masculine plural eterni, feminine plural eterne)

  1. eternal, everlasting
    Synonym: eternale (archaic, poetic)
    • 1343, Giovanni Boccaccio, Amorosa visione[1], published 1833, Chapter 2, page 11:
      Il corto termine della vita posto ¶ Non è da consumare in quelle cose, ¶ che ’l bene eterno ci fanno nascosto.
      The short limit set to life is not to be consumed in those things which make the eternal goodness hidden from us.
    • 1516, Ludovico Ariosto, Orlando Furioso [Raging Roland]‎[2], Venice: Printed by Gabriel Giolito, published 1551, Canto 42, page 195:
      Piena d’un foco eterno è quella mazza, ¶ Che ſenza conſumarſi ogn’hora auampa; ¶ Ne per buon ſcudo o tempra di corazza ¶ O per groſſezza d’elmo ſe ne ſcampa.
      That mace is filled with an eternal fire, always burning without ever dying out; and no good shield, or tempered armour, or thick helm is enough to escape it.
    • 1530, Pietro Bembo, “Libro I, Capitolo III”, in Gli asolani, published 1989:
      Infin quel dì, che pria la punse Amore, ¶ Andromeda ebbe sempre affanno e noia; ¶ Poi ch’a Perseo si diè, diletto e gioia ¶ Seguilla viva, e morta eterno onore.
      Until that day, before she was stung by Love, Andromeda was always bothered and bored; after she gave herself to Perseus, she was followed by delight and joy in life, and eternal honour in death.
    • 1799, Vittorio Alfieri, “Proemio”, in Misogallo [The French-Hater]‎[3], London, lines 1–4, page 51:
      Odio all’emula Roma acerbo eterno ¶ Giurava il forte Annibale su l’ara: ¶ Nè a vuoto usciva la minaccia amara, ¶ Che gli era anzi di Gloria eccelso perno.
      Harsh, eternal hatred to the rival Rome swore Hannibal the strong upon the altar; and the bitter threat was not in vain, but instead was paramount crux of glory to him.
    • 1803, Ugo Foscolo, “Alla sera [To the Evening]”, in Sonetti [Sonnets]‎[4], collected in Opere scelte di Ugo Foscolo, vol. 2, Florence, published 1835, page 116:
      Vagar mi fai co’ miei pensier su l’orme ¶ Che vanno al nulla eterno; e intanto fugge ¶ Questo reo tempo, e van con lui le torme ¶ Delle cure, onde meco egli si strugge
      You make me wander with my thoughts, on footprints leading to eternal nothingness; meanwhile, this guilty time passes, and with him the crowds of worries that make him struggle along with me

NounEdit

eterno m (uncountable)

  1. eternity
    • 1835, Giacomo Leopardi, “XII. L'infinito [12. The Infinite]”, in Canti[5], Bari: Einaudi, published 1917, lines 8–11, page 49:
      [] E come il vento ¶ odo stormir tra queste piante, io quello ¶ infinito silenzio a questa voce ¶ vo comparando: e mi sovvien l’eterno
      And, as I hear the wind blowing through these plants, I compare that infinite silence to this voice, and I think of eternity
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

VerbEdit

eterno

  1. first-person singular present indicative of eternare

AnagramsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • eterno in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin aeternus, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eyu- (vital energy).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

eterno m (feminine singular eterna, masculine plural eternos, feminine plural eternas, comparable)

  1. eternal

Related termsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin aeternus.

AdjectiveEdit

eterno (feminine singular eterna, masculine plural eternos, feminine plural eternas)

  1. eternal

Related termsEdit