expedite

See also: expedité

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin expedītus (unimpeded, unfettered), perfect passive participle of expediō (bring forward, set right).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɛk.spəˌdaɪt/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈɛk.spɪˌdaɪt/
  • (file)
  • (file)

VerbEdit

expedite (third-person singular simple present expedites, present participle expediting, simple past and past participle expedited)

  1. (transitive) To accelerate the progress of.
    He expedited the search by alphabetizing the papers.
    • 1960 June, “British cars go by rail: I-The L.M.R. wins new Anglo-Scottish traffic”, in Trains Illustrated, page 335:
      [...] moreover, there are times of pressure when, to expedite deliveries, cars may be driven in what should otherwise be the running-in period at speeds that do them no good - and over long distances too.
  2. (transitive) To perform (a task) fast and efficiently.

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

expedite (comparative more expedite, superlative most expedite)

  1. Free of impediment; unimpeded.
    • 1594, Richard Hooker, Of the Lawes of Ecclesiastical Politie
      to make the way plain and expedite
  2. Expeditious; quick; prompt.

Further readingEdit

  • expedite” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2020.

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From expedītus (unimpeded, unfettered), perfect passive participle of expediō (liberate, free).

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

expedītē (comparative expedītius, superlative expedītissimē)

  1. freely, without impediment.
  2. readily, promptly, quickly

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

expedite

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of expeditar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of expeditar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of expeditar.
  4. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of expeditar.